Flow from fissure 8 continues to pour into ocean
  • Friday, December 14, 2018
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Flow from fissure 8 continues to pour into ocean

  • This timeline of maps provided by USGS shows the progression of lava from May 4 to June 5, 2018.
    Video by Sarah Domai / Honolulu Star-Advertiser
  • Field crews conducted a helicopter overflight of the braided lava channel in Kilauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone today, around 6:30 a.m., looking for spillovers.
    Video courtesy USGS
  • Eruption update of Puu Oo, Halemaumau, and the East Rift Zone in Lower Puna.
    USGS
  • GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Lava pumped out of fissure 8 as viewed from Luana Street in Leilani Estates on Saturday.

  • COURTESY USGS

    Fissure 8 was still active and effusing voluminous lava Friday morning. Fountains were contained within the cone, with limited bursts sending spatter onto the sides.

  • COURTESY USGS

    Fissure 8 continued building a tephra cone today and producing robust channelized lava in Kilauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    A resident gate remained intact Wednesday among the fallen trees and steaming lava field near fissure 8 at Nohea Street in Leilani Estates.

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UPDATE: Monday 6:15 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full lava channel flowing into the ocean at Kapoho, according to the Hawaii County Civil Defense.

Although there are no immediate threats, people near the flow should be prepared to evacuate, the Civil Defense said.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses on Hawaii island that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption. The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and is located at the Keaau High School Gym.

Tropic Care 2018 will provide free medical, dental and eye care today through Thursday at Keaau High School between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tropic Care is open to everyone.

Sunday 5:30 p.m.

A collapse explosion event happened at Kilauea’s summit this afternoon, Hawaii County Civil Defense said.

The event occurred at 4:12 p.m., releasing an amount of energy equivalent to an earthquake of magnitude 5.3. No tsunami was generated.

Civil Defense said a small ash plume may affect surrounding areas, and wind could carry the ash plume to the southwest toward Wood Valley, Pahala, and Ocean View.

12:30 p.m.

Eruption activity continues in the Lower East Zone with no significant change in the last 24 hours, reports the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Fissure 8 remains active and the spatter cone is now 180 feet at its tallest point. Pele’s hair and lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the fissure’s lava fountain continue to fall downwind of the area.

Hawaii County Civil Defense reminded residents in the Volcano area to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity and water due to frequent earthquake activity.

The FEMA Disaster Recovery Center is open until 8 p.m. at Keaau High School.

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>> Moderate quake shakes Kilauea summit
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>> Ashfall, vog lowers air quality for residents of Ocean View
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>> Survivors of past Hawaii lava recall despair and opportunity
>> Hundreds of animals among lava refugees
>> Influx of new people has brought more crime, shelter residents say
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>> Opening viewing points might shore up Big Island’s visitor industry
>> Kilauea eruption will fuel volcano research for years to come
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The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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