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Halemaumau Crater explosion shakes Kilauea summit

  • Drone video shows changes at Kilauea summit since the explosive eruptions began in mid-May.
    Courtesy USGS
  • Raw video of fissure 8 on Jun 23, 2018.
    Video by George F. Lee/ glee@staradvertiser.com
  • Few in Hawaii may have heard of World Central Kitchen, but hundreds of displaced residents from Leilani Estates, Lanipuna Gardens and other areas in Lower Puna affected by volcanic activity are getting made-from-scratch meals prepared daily by the group's all-volunteer crew.
    Video by Sarah Domai / Honolulu Star-Advertiser
  • A fast-moving lava river feeds into Kapoho Bay on Hawaii island. Visit www.staradvertiser.com for more Kilauea coverage.
    Video by George F. Lee / glee@staradvertiser.com
  • Geologists captured this time-lapse video of the perched lava channel issuing from fissure 8 on Kilauea's lower East Rift Zone. Rafts of accreted lava move down stream and look like boats moving down a river.
    Video courtesy USGS
  • U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Fresh lava oozes at several points in the area of Kapoho Beach Lots today.

  • U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    A morning overflight, today, revealed that the northern margin of the flow field at the coast is oozing fresh lava at several points in the area of Kapoho Beach Lots. Small channel overflows were feeding short pahoehoe flows.

  • COURTESY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Multiple lobes of lava flowed into the ocean Tuesday morning, as seen in an overflight facing north.

  • GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Lava pumped out of fissure 8 as viewed from Luana Street in Leilani Estates on Saturday.

  • COURTESY USGS

    Fissure 8 was still active and effusing voluminous lava Friday morning. Fountains were contained within the cone, with limited bursts sending spatter onto the sides.

  • COURTESY USGS

    Fissure 8 continued building a tephra cone today and producing robust channelized lava in Kilauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    A resident gate remained intact Wednesday among the fallen trees and steaming lava field near fissure 8 at Nohea Street in Leilani Estates.

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UPDATE: 12:45 p.m.

No active overflows were observed in this morning’s overflight, according to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

The spatter cone is now 180 feet tall and the lava fountains only occassionally crest the top.

6:30 a.m.

An explosion at Kilauea’s Halemaumau Crater rocked the summit area before dawn today.

The explosive event occurred at 4:49 a.m., according to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory officials. An accompanying earthquake measured magnitude 5.4 but did not pose a tsunami threat, according to the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center.

Fissure 8 continues to be active, feeding the lava channel traveling to the ocean in Kapoho. The flow continues to expand south along the shoreline, the HVO said. Fresh lava is oozing at Kapoho Beach Lots, and gas emissions and laze continue to be very high.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27

4:30 p.m.

The fissure 8 flow is expanding south along the shoreline, and is oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and laze at the ocean entry remain high.

Residents are not allowed to enter their homes in Kapoho due to the active lava. No additional houses have been destroyed at this time.

10:30 a.m.

Fountains from fissure 8 continue to supply lava to the open channel with small, short-lived overflows along the way.

The spatter cone is now 180 feet tall, according to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Residents of Leilani Estates expressed concern about looting of their homes at a community meeting Tuesday night.

6:30 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to be very active, feeding the lava channel flowing into the ocean in Kapoho.

The flow is also still expanding south along the shoreline, according to Hawaii County Civil Defense.

“Due to frequent earthquakes, residents in the Volcano area are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes,” Civil Defense said in a bulletin.

TUESDAY, JUNE 26

10:35 a.m.

Although fissure 8 continues to fountain and supply lava that’s pouring into the ocean in Kapoho, there has been no significant change to the eruption in the last 24 hours, according to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory officials.

The lava flow front at the coast has broadened southward and now measures nearly 2 miles wide. Lava is entering the ocean mainly through the open channel, but also along a 0.6-mile wide area with multiple laze plumes from smaller oozing lobes, the HVO said.

7:15 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt, filling the lava channel on the way to the ocean in Kapoho.

Gas emissions are still “very high,” according to the Hawaii County Civil Defense. However, there are no immediate threats to nearby residents.

A community meeting will be held today at the Pahoa High School cafeteria at 5 p.m.

MONDAY, JUNE 25

5:25 p.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said there is no tsunami threat following a collapse/explosion event that occurred around 5:03 p.m. today at the Kilauea summit. The energy released from the event is the equivalent of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake.

The event resulted in a small plume made of mostly steam and little ash.

Residents in the Volcano area are asked to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity and water after earthquakes.

5:05 p.m.

The latest number of homes destroyed by the Kilauea eruption was at 657 as of today, according to Hawaii County Civil Defense.

Fissure 8 continues to flow into the ocean at Kapoho Bay, with a widening flow front that is now three-quarters of a mile from Ahalanui Beach Park, popular for its warm ponds, according to Hawaii County spokeswoman Janet Snyder.

The flow front is now about two miles wide, according to USGS, but it is unknown when the lava will hit Ahalanui. USGS said it is very difficult to gauge because there is currently only one overflight a day. Access to the area is very hazardous, with heavy plumes of laze.

So far, 6,164 acres have been covered by lava.

Fissure 22 is the only other fissure showing activity, but very little, with a glow, but no spattering.

6:15 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full lava channel flowing into the ocean at Kapoho, according to the Hawaii County Civil Defense.

Although there are no immediate threats, people near the flow should be prepared to evacuate, the Civil Defense said.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses on Hawaii island that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption. The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and is located at the Keaau High School Gym.

Tropic Care 2018 will provide free medical, dental and eye care today through Thursday at Keaau High School between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tropic Care is open to everyone.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24

5:30 p.m.

A collapse explosion event happened at Kilauea’s summit this afternoon, Hawaii County Civil Defense said.

The event occurred at 4:12 p.m., releasing an amount of energy equivalent to an earthquake of magnitude 5.3. No tsunami was generated.

Civil Defense said a small ash plume may affect surrounding areas, and wind could carry the ash plume to the southwest toward Wood Valley, Pahala, and Ocean View.

12:30 p.m.

Eruption activity continues in the Lower East Zone with no significant change in the last 24 hours, reports the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Fissure 8 remains active and the spatter cone is now 180 feet at its tallest point. Pele’s hair and lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the fissure’s lava fountain continue to fall downwind of the area.

Hawaii County Civil Defense reminded residents in the Volcano area to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity and water due to frequent earthquake activity.

The FEMA Disaster Recovery Center is open until 8 p.m. at Keaau High School.

MORE KILAUEA COVERAGE
>> 4 more people cited for loitering in lava disaster zone
>> World Central Kitchen helps ensure quality meals available for evacuees
>> Kilauea emissions affect Malama Ki Forest reserve
>> Salvation Army serves up meals at Red Cross shelters
>> Lava blocks access to favorite Hawaii island shoreline sites
>> Volcanic activity destroying marine and forest preserves
>> State leaders should be devising plans now to help volcano-affected businesses recover
>> Real estate loss from eruption approaches $400 million
>> Charter school co-founder looks to future after eruption
>> Closed voting sites and early absentee ballots raise concerns in Puna
>> Hula conference, chants to Pele coincide with the eruption
>> Kilauea eruption has cost state, county more than $5.8M
>> Lava output far outpaces previous eruptions
>> For National Guard, lava disaster presents real-world mission
>> Scientists monitoring renewed fissure activity

MORE KILAUEA COVERAGE
>> Kilauea eruption has cost state, county more than $5.8M
>> Lava output far outpaces previous eruptions
>> Fifth world conference on hula underway in Hilo
>> Council members anticipate special session over lava’s ramifications
>> Despite reports, Kilauea eruption not causing gems to rain from sky
>> For National Guard, lava disaster presents real-world mission
>> Scientists monitoring renewed fissure activity
>> Big Island disaster survivors flow into a FEMA aid center on opening day
>> Moderate quake shakes Kilauea summit
>> Congresswoman Hanabusa visits Hawaii island
>> Kilauea eruption is classic example of ‘gentle’ volcano
>> Ashfall, vog lowers air quality for residents of Ocean View
>> Big Isle tourism campaign gets love in Ohio
>> Kilauea isn’t Hawaii’s only active volcano
>> Survivors of past Hawaii lava recall despair and opportunity
>> Hundreds of animals among lava refugees
>> Influx of new people has brought more crime, shelter residents say
>> Helicopter mission allows widow to gather belongings before losing home to lava
>> Opening viewing points might shore up Big Island’s visitor industry
>> Kilauea eruption will fuel volcano research for years to come
>> Photos, words fall short in describing volcano
>> Prolonged papaya shortage expected in wake of volcanic activity


The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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