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New photos show different scenes of Kilauea’s eruption

  • COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe lava lake in Halemaumau Crater was spattering at points on the west and northwest side of the lake. This photo shows the spattering on the lake's northwest side. The pit wall to the right overhangs the lake by about 33 feet. If the lake continues to rise, pieces of this overhang may collapse (note the cracks at lower right marking planes of weakness).
    COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The lava lake in Halemaumau Crater was spattering at points on the west and northwest side of the lake. This photo shows the spattering on the lake's northwest side. The pit wall to the right overhangs the lake by about 33 feet. If the lake continues to rise, pieces of this overhang may collapse (note the cracks at lower right marking planes of weakness).
  • A thin gas plume permitted a decent view of the south wall of the pit holding the lava lake in HalemaÔumaÔu. On Friday, the lava lake was not spattering at its usual point near the left side of the lake in this view.

    A thin gas plume permitted a decent view of the south wall of the pit holding the lava lake in HalemaÔumaÔu. On Friday, the lava lake was not spattering at its usual point near the left side of the lake in this view.
  • COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe ocean entry east of the National Park boundary near KupapaÔu Point remains weak, with a wispy plume, as seen in this photo looking southwest along the coast.
    COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The ocean entry east of the National Park boundary near KupapaÔu Point remains weak, with a wispy plume, as seen in this photo looking southwest along the coast.
  • COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe lava lake in Halemaumau was 115 feet below the floor of the crater Friday morning. The lake is about 720 feet long and 525 feet wide.
    COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The lava lake in Halemaumau was 115 feet below the floor of the crater Friday morning. The lake is about 720 feet long and 525 feet wide.
  • COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe main entry point of the KupapaÔu ocean entry comprises a few small streams of lava, seen here cascading into the water.
    COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The main entry point of the KupapaÔu ocean entry comprises a few small streams of lava, seen here cascading into the water.
  • COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe KahaualeÔa 2 flow continues to invade the forest line north of PuÔu ÔOøÔoø. Poor weather prevented good views but made for an eerie scene.
    COURTESY USGS/HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The KahaualeÔa 2 flow continues to invade the forest line north of PuÔu ÔOøÔoø. Poor weather prevented good views but made for an eerie scene.

Photos released by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory over the weekend show a rising lava lake in Halemaumau Crater, the Kahaualea 2 lava flow north of Puu Oo Crater burning through a forested area, and lava continuing to enter the ocean south of Puu Oo at Kupapau.

The Halemaumau Crater photos show the fountaining in the lava lake on Friday as the lake level rose to about 115 feet below the crater floor.

Lava continues to enter the ocean at Kupapau, near the border with the national park. But the lava flow is weak, according to scientists monitoring the eruption.

Most of the lava seems to be going north to the Kahaualea 2 lava flow. That flow is burning through some forest north of Puu Oo Crater.

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