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Tropical storm hits Philippines

  • ASSOCIATED PRESSResidents look at a Vietnamese cargo vessel Minh Tuan 68 that broke its mooring and was swept towards the shore by Tropical Storm Rumbia Sunday June 30, 2013 in Legazpi city, Albay province in central Philippines. The cargo vessel, seized by authorities September 2012 loaded with thousands of sacks of rice, was anchored off the waters of Albay when swept by the storm's strong winds and big waves. Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Residents look at a Vietnamese cargo vessel Minh Tuan 68 that broke its mooring and was swept towards the shore by Tropical Storm Rumbia Sunday June 30, 2013 in Legazpi city, Albay province in central Philippines. The cargo vessel, seized by authorities September 2012 loaded with thousands of sacks of rice, was anchored off the waters of Albay when swept by the storm's strong winds and big waves. Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESSA Filipino woman and her baby sit behind plastic sheets to protect them from rain as they ride a pedicab in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A Filipino woman and her baby sit behind plastic sheets to protect them from rain as they ride a pedicab in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESSA Filipino man places a plastic sheet along the walls of his house as they brace for rains in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A Filipino man places a plastic sheet along the walls of his house as they brace for rains in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESSA Filipino woman passes by a pedicab terminal during rain in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A Filipino woman passes by a pedicab terminal during rain in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESSA Filipino man pushes his tricycle along a flooded street in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A Filipino man pushes his tricycle along a flooded street in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESSFilipino workers load goods on a tricycle along a flooded area in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Filipino workers load goods on a tricycle along a flooded area in suburban Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday June 30, 2013. Tropical Storm Rumbia shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

MANILA, Philippines – A tropical storm shifted and spared the Philippine capital Sunday (Saturday in Hawaii) but stranded thousands of commuters, toppled trees and knocked out power in outlying provinces.

Forecasters had predicted that Tropical Storm Rumbia would hit the densely populated Manila metropolis early Sunday, sparking emergency preparations. Instead it veered away and struck Batangas province, about 50 miles south of Manila, then blew away toward the South China Sea, officials said.

There were no immediate reports of deaths or injuries from the storm, which packed sustained winds of 40 miles per hour and gusts of 50 mph.

Strong winds and rain pounded on roofs and swayed trees before dawn in the capital of more than 12 million people, then the sun emerged.

The government’s disaster-response agency said 1,600 villagers fled their homes in Albay province, southeast of Manila, amid heavy rains, while more than 10,000 commuters were stranded as ferry and cargo boats suspended trips. Several provinces reported power outages and minor landslides.

Rumbia is the seventh storm or typhoon to hit the Philippines this year. An average of 21 strike the country in a year.

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