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New lava flow follows collapse of Pu’u ‘O’o crater floor

  • COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYLava broke out from a vent low on the west flank of the Pu‘u ‘?‘? cone. Lava erupting from the flank vent is entirely within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and pose no hazard to residents.
    COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    Lava broke out from a vent low on the west flank of the Pu‘u ‘?‘? cone. Lava erupting from the flank vent is entirely within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and pose no hazard to residents.
  • COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYThe orange glow from a new lava flow can be seen in the distance in this image taken this morning from a webcam. The camera is looking east at the Pu'u 'O'o vent.
    COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    The orange glow from a new lava flow can be seen in the distance in this image taken this morning from a webcam. The camera is looking east at the Pu'u 'O'o vent.
  • COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYLava filled the floor of the Puka Nui pit (lower left) and the MLK pit (lower right) on the west end of Pu`u `? `? crater last month.
    COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    Lava filled the floor of the Puka Nui pit (lower left) and the MLK pit (lower right) on the west end of Pu`u `? `? crater last month.
  • COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORYIn this photo talke last month,  lava exits Pu‘u ‘?‘?  through a gap in the southwest side of the Pu‘u ‘?‘? cone, and flows a short distance down Pu‘u ‘?‘?’s flank, completely filling the Puka Nui and MLK pits.
    COURTESY: USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY
    In this photo talke last month, lava exits Pu‘u ‘?‘? through a gap in the southwest side of the Pu‘u ‘?‘? cone, and flows a short distance down Pu‘u ‘?‘?’s flank, completely filling the Puka Nui and MLK pits.

 

Activity at a new lava flow on the west flank of Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater appears to be decreasing in vigor, scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said this morning.

An overflight of the new lava flow was planned for this morning.

At about 2 p.m. Wednesday, lava began flowing from vents located less than one-half mile from the Kamoamoa fissure that erupted in March.

The lava flowed northwest into forests and about 2.2 miles south of the vents by 5 p.m. The flow is entirely contained in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and poses no threat to private property, scientists said. The flow continued overnight, but appears to be less active.

Volcanologist Janet Babb said it’s the first time lava has broken out at the volcano since March, aside from some that spilled out at the Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater last week. 

The new lava activity followed a collapse of the crater flow in Pu‘u ‘O‘o. The lava lake that had been building for the last few months disappeared in the collapse.

Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes. It has been constantly erupting since Jan. 2, 1983.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webcams

 

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