• Friday, September 21, 2018
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Kauakukalahale

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Kani ē ka ʻōlē walo i ke kula i Mannahatta

Synopsis: People in New York employ their car horns indiscriminately. It is clearly not intended to effect change in the behavior of other drivers. It seems more like griping, a form of self-therapy. Read More

He mana ko ka inoa, ʻaʻole e kapakapa wale ʻia aku

Synopsis: I no longer call President Donald Trump “Huli” for a number of reasons. For one, it is a very important word in traditional Hawaiian. These meanings should be thought of first, before thinking of the introduced card game. Read More

ʻUʻuku ka uku ke ʻuʻu ka ʻuku

Synopsis: Very few words have been borrowed from Hawaiian into English. The borrowing has been done in the opposite direction. This balance of trade is untenable if we are concerned with the health of the Hawaiian language and the maintenance of Hawaiian worldviews. Read More

Ua pili anei ka make i ka makemake?

Synopsis: English glosses of Hawaiian words can offer false equivalencies that effectively alter their intended meanings. Translation will ultimately supplant traditional Hawaiian worldviews through the perversion of meaning. Read More

Nani Kauaʻi hemolele i ka mālie

This is a brief account of an astonishing journey by the children of Ke Kula ‘o Samuel M. Kamakau’s Papa Kukui, to Kaua‘i. Lots of hospitality and love in the beautiful lands of Manokalanipō. Read More

E pā Mau ana kahi Kukunaokalā mālamalama

Synopsis: In remembrance of an awesome husband, father, mentor, coach, friend and leader, Sulu Mau Tafaoimalo. Read More
 

Na ke ola e kūpale i ka make i ʻole e haumia

Synopsis: Cultural differences come to a head on Maui. Developers unearth bones from an ancient burial site in order to construct a restroom. Protesters put their safety on the line to protect the site. Read More

E ʻimi i ke ola ma waho aku o ka pū

Synopsis: Recent gun violence has raised the issue of gun control. Although guns enable us to protect ourselves from the government, we shouldn’t have to rely on something so dangerous as our only check on runaway government. Read More

Mai makaʻu i ka manioka, hiki ke ʻai ʻia

It is possible to eat cassava root, but it must be cleaned properly or the outer bark of the root, and the layer immediately below that, are toxic and can cause death. Nothing to fear. Read More
 

Hilahila ʻoe, make ʻoe

There is value to keeping a little bit of shame around to prevent us from being too audacious and to remind us that we are social creatures whose actions affect others. Read More

He hāwaʻe ʻiʻo ʻole ka unuhi

People are now allowed to provide testimony in Hawaiian during court proceedings. The catch is that an English translation must be provided. This is a vacuous concession. Read More

Aloha nō kahi keiki ʻike ʻole i ka helu pō

I’m sure the super blue blood moon that made a rare appearance early Wednesday morning in our skies was something to behold. Those lucky enough to see it will no doubt cherish it forever. Are there words in Hawaiian to indicate such an event? Let us know. Read More

Kīhēhē wale aku ka poʻe Hawaiʻi i ke au iā Maleka

A court case on Maui has brought attention to Hawaiian rights with respect to the domains of language use. Read More

Kani ke oeoe, he piʻoloke ko ka ʻāina

The nuclear missile alarm caused serious consternation, but people remained courteous on the roads. As for the assignment of blame, we should look no further than the two despotic leaders who are peddling fear. Lock ’em up and let ’em fight each other. Read More

ʻInoʻino ke kai ua ʻau ʻia e ke kae

Unusually high levels of enterococci bacteria have been reported in the waters off Ala Moana Beach. Read More

Halihali ʻia ka huaale lāʻau pā ma ka leka

A pilot program involving four states, including Hawaiʻi, that offers abortion approval by teleconference with a doctor has invited protest. Is this about abortion rights or abortion procedures? Read More

E kū ka‘eo i ke kala‘ihi o Maleka

Whereas Hawaiian is one of two official languages of the state, a defendant should be allowed to present a defense in Hawaiian, and not be forced to operate within the limitations of English. Read More

Nō ka wai ‘ino, ‘ino‘ino ka ‘āina

Synopsis: Many homes in Hawaiæi are still utilizing cesspools to handle wastewater. This is not a sustainable practice as it could ultimately seep into our sources of drinking water. Read More

Na ke kāleka ia e hōʻoia i ke kanaka?

Synopsis: If you have to renew your state ID, be sure to take all the necessary documents — birth certificate, Social Security card, and two documents verifying your resident address. Read More

Nalo ka wahine i loko o ka huaʻōlelo aikāne

Synopsis: There is an implication attached to the word aikāne, that it only applies to males. Females are not represented based on its overt construction. Its meaning, generally understood through English translations, can carry negative connotations. Read More

E mau ka pono o ka Lā Kūʻokoʻa

Sir George Simpson of the Hudson Bay Company is one of the lesser known plenipotentiary envoys sent by Kauikeaouli to America and Europe to secure a treaty recognizing Hawaii as an independent state. Read More

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