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Friday, September 19, 2014         

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Letters to the Editor

For Thursday, August 19, 2010


POSTED:

Elderly voters have needs, too

Thanks to Richard Borreca for reminding people who are running for office that seniors do go to the polls and that they represent an important voting block ("Politicians must tap older voters to ensure victory," Star-Advertiser, Aug. 15).

This election season, candidates can differentiate themselves by acknowledging Hawaii's graying communities. A dialogue on senior issues could include shoring up Hawaii's long-term-care infrastructure, assisting naturally occurring retirement communities, supporting "aging in place," respite for family caregivers and pedestrian safety for the elderly, just to name a few worthy topics.

Marc Delorme and Audrey Kubota
Film producers, "The Graying of Hawaii"

 

How to write us

The Star-Advertiser welcomes letters that are crisp and to the point (~175 words). The Star-Advertiser reserves the right to edit letters for clarity and length. Please direct comments to the issues; personal attacks will not be published. Letters must be signed and include a daytime telephone number.

Letter form: Online form, click here
E-mail: letters@staradvertiser.com
Fax: (808) 529-4750
Mail: Letters to the Editor, Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 7 Waterfront Plaza, 500 Ala Moana, Suite 210, Honolulu, HI 96813

Afghanistan war a waste of lives

Gen. David Petraeus is waging war on two fronts: One in Afghanistan and one in the media concerning civilian deaths.

A United Nations report found civilian casualties rose 31 percent the first six months this year. Our troops protect no one. The presence of 100,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan is neither wise nor necessary. This war is causing a permanent deficit financially and morally.

Begin withdrawal of all troops and contractors immediately.

Patricia Blair
Kailua

 

Shapiro wrong about quote

David Shapiro wrote how I "waxed eloquently about 'good haoles' in my autobiography" ("Politicians need to get over the plantation-era bigotry," Star-Advertiser, Aug. 18). Here's what I wrote on page 88 of my book about the friendship between (local) Wally Fujiyama and (haole) Frank Padgett:

"To Wally, Padgett was a 'good haole,' a mantle he (Wally) bestowed as a high compliment for his haole friends, though haoles who did not know Wally would have found it patronizing. In Wally's mind, 'good haoles' were those who 'accepted and respected local people.'"

In reviewing my book, Shapiro called it "one of the most important books ever written on Hawaii politics." Shapiro is the best political columnist in Hawaii today, and I appreciated his high praise. But he is wrong on the "good haole" quote.

Ben Cayetano
Honolulu

 

Brochure did not spin facts

I believe the core intent of Mufi Hannemann's "Compare and Decide" brochure is to inform the public, not fear monger or personally to ruin his competitor. Yes, the information about Neil Abercrombie highlights his negative attributes; but this reflection results from his own actions, not a spin by the Hannemann campaign. The truth is that Abercrombie was ranked last in overall legislative performance by Congress.org (August 2008) for his congressional class.

The truth is Abercrombie had one of the poorest voting records for the 111th Congress.

The brochure offered information easily found on the Internet, but in a condensed format. It left the content open to interpretation, which can be spun by individuals based on their own assumptions.

Seanna Pieper-Jordan
Kaimuki

 

Speed cushions would aid safety

There should be speed cushions placed on roads where racing and pedestrian accidents are known to be a problem, such as King Street, Halawa Heights Road and Kalanianaole Highway east of Waimanalo.

Speed cushions would allow emergency vehicles to go through unimpeded, unlike speed bumps. Traffic could be slowed to legal speed without the expense of police or stoplights.

Erin Braley
Aiea

 

'Overcollecting' is not a threat to future of Hawaiian cowries

The statements that Hawaiian cowries are physically becoming smaller and extinct because of collecting is not correct, nor based on research ("Cowries getting smaller because of overcollecting," Star-Advertiser, Aug. 16).

The shells in Hawaii are not getting smaller. In fact, some world record and near-world record shells have been recently discovered. I have had to vouch for some of these specimens for catalogue lodgment. Natural predation and natural disasters, like hurricanes, represent a much greater threat to shell life than shell collectors. To date, no cowry species is known to have been made extinct by collectors anywhere in the world.

Most collectors abide by the decades-old "Sheller's Creed" of conduct, which encourages conservation by ensuring collectors don't take live shells sitting on eggs or young, immature specimens that have not had the opportunity to breed.

Dr. Jon-Paul Bingham
Board member and scientific advisor to the Hawaiian Malacological Society






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