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Ua nā paha ka lua o ka inaina

For Saturday, September 21, 2013

Na Kekeha Solis

POSTED:



Synopsis: Did the artist of “Forgotten Inheritance” never intend “to disrespect anyone, especially the Hawaiian community”?

———

I ka Pō'ahā nei, ua kūkala a'ela ka Pelekikena o ke Ke'ena Mana Ho'omāka'ika'i o Hawai'i, 'o Mike McCartney, e huki 'ia ke kapa e uhi aku ana i ke ki'i paia a Hans Ladislaus. A he mana'o maika'i nō ia, 'oiai, ua ho'olālā 'ia iho nei ka hālāwai hō'eu'eu no ke kū'ē ‘ana aku i ia uhi 'ia 'ana iho o ke ki'i paia a Ladislaus. 'Oiai, ua 'ae iho nei 'o McCartney e huki 'ia ke kapa uhi, ua kāpae 'ia akula ia hālāwai hō'eu'eu.

Akā, e McCartney, e maka'ala paha 'oe, o 'ākoakoa nā kānaka o kekahi 'ao'ao no ke kū'ē 'ana. Kohu mea lā, ua pili pū 'o McCartney i ka paia. Ua mākaukau paha nā 'ao'ao 'elua no ke kū'ē 'ana. Ua a'o paha 'o ia i ka 'ōlelo a kahiko, 'o ia ho'i, “e a'o i ke koa, a'o nō i ka holo.” 'Eā, 'o ka wā nō paha kēia e holo ai. Akā, inā he mana'o kou e wiwo 'ole a e lilo i koa no ka lā nui a me ka lā iki, eia mai kekahi mea e no'ono'o ai.

'O ka mua, inā e ho'omau 'ia ka uhi 'ia 'ana aku o ke ki'i paia, he ho'okahi wale nō na'au e 'eha. 'O ko Ladislaus na'au. A ke huki 'ia a'e ia kapa uhi, he mau haneli kaukani paha ke 'eha.

'O kahi mea 'āpiki, 'ōlelo a'ela ka mea nāna ia ki'i paia, “'A'ohe kanaka i noi aku iā ia i ka uhi i ke ki'i paia.” (Inā pēlā, no ke aha 'o ia i 'ae 'ole aku ai i kona noi 'ia 'ana.) Ho'omau ihola 'o ia ala i ka 'ī ‘ana mai, 'o ke noi 'ole 'ia 'ana ona “'o ia ka mea mua e ho'oponopono 'ia. He mea nui loa ia no nā kānaka hana no'eau a pau a me nā kānaka e pili ana i kēia nīnau nui, e ho'oponopono ai.” A ma hope mai, 'ōlelo maila 'o ia ala, “'A'ohe ona mana'o, e hō'ino i kekahi, a 'o ka 'oi loa aku, 'o ka Lāhui Hawai'i. Ua hō'ike a'e au i ko'u aloha i ka 'āina a me kona mau kānaka ma o ka'u hana no'eau.” No kaihe'e paha 'o ia ala. 'O kāna 'ōlelo, 'a'ohe ona mana'o e hō'ino i ka Lāhui Hawai'i, eia na'e kekahi mau Kānaka Maoli o Hawai'i nei ke 'ōlelo nei, ua 'eha nō ka na'au ke nānā aku i kāna ki'i paia. A kohu mea lā, he mea 'ole ia, 'o ka mea nui iā ia, 'o ia ka ho'oponopono 'ana i kona 'eha pono'ī, 'a'ohe ona nānā iki i ka 'eha o ka na'au o kekahi, a o ke Kanaka Maoli paha.

A 'o kahi pulakaumaka o ko 'oukou mea kākau, 'o ia ka 'ōlelo a ua kanaka lā nāna ke ki'i paia, 'o ia ho'i, “'A'ohe ona mana'o e hō'ino i kekahi, a 'o ka 'oi loa aku, 'o ka Lāhui Hawai'i, akā, ke nānā aku i ka inoa āna i kapa aku i ia ki'i paia, 'o ia nō 'o “Ka Waiwai Ho'oilina Poina 'Ia” (Forgotten Inheritance). He kuhikuhi pololei 'ia nō ke Kanaka Maoli a ke kāpilipili aku nei nō ho'i i ka hewa ma luna o ke Kanaka Maoli. No wai lā nā iwi i kanu 'ia aku nei i ke one a i ka lepo paha? No nā kūpuna o nā Kānaka Maoli.

'O kekahi 'ōlelo a ka po'e kāko'o iā Ladislaus, 'a'ole i nui nā kānaka i kū'ē i ia ki'i paia. Akā, 'a'ole nō paha nui nā Kānaka Maoli i komo aku i loko o ke Kikowaena Mālama 'Aha o Hawai'i a i 'ike aku paha i ia ki'i.

———

E ho‘ouna ‘ia mai na ā leka iā m?ua, ‘o ia ho‘i ‘o Laiana Wong a me Kekeha Solis ma ka pahu leka uila ma lalo nei:

>> kwong@hawaii.edu
>> rsolis@hawaii.edu

a i ‘ole ia, ma ke kelepona:

>> 956-2627 (Laiana)
>> 956-2627 (Kekeha)

This column is coordinated by Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.






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Ken_Conklin wrote:
Author Mark Twain in 1866 observed an enormous number of human bones lying exposed to the sun in Diamond Head crater where they had lain in the open for so many years nobody knew what had happened -- clearly the monarchy and the ordinary people knew about the bones but never felt a need to bury them.
Twain's essay describing his horse ride through Diamond Head crater on April 24, 1866 is at
http://www.twainquotes.com/18660424u.html

Some excerpts:
All around everywhere, not three feet apart, the bleached bones of men gleamed white in the moonlight. We picked up a lot of them for mementoes. I got quite a number of arm bones and leg bones ... and wore the choicest of them out on [my horse] afterward, trying to make him go. ... I did not think it was just right to carry off any of these bones, but we did it, anyhow. We considered that it was at least as right as it is for the Hawaiian Government and the city of Honolulu ... to permit those remains to lie decade after decade, to bleach and rot in sun and wind and suffer desecration by careless strangers and by the beasts of the field, unprotected by even a worm-fence. Call us hard names if you will, you statesmen and missionaries! but I say shame upon you, that after raising a nation from idolatry to Christianity, and from barbarism to civilization, you have not taught it the comment [sic] of respect for the dead. ... these skeletons have lain for ages just where their proprietors fell ... we rode a considerable distance over ground so thickly strewn with human bones that the horses' feet crushed them, not occasionally, but at every step."


on September 21,2013 | 07:33AM
DiverDave wrote:
Yes Dr. Conklin, It seems that revisionist historians like to use the word "sacred" a lot when it is politically advantageous to do so. The real truth is that under Alii rule the commoner meant nothing and was easily expendable. Paulette Kaleikini and Faye Honohono are of the same ilk. They both believe that their race is somehow supreme over all the multitude of other races in Hawaii, and that only their interpretation of what an artist's message is or an artist's method matters. Racial supremacy based on false belief systems make them what?
on September 22,2013 | 07:34AM
Grimbold wrote:
Buga buga bugs in braina pah hoh.
on September 21,2013 | 09:11AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
My goodness. Such an intelligent comment.
on September 21,2013 | 12:04PM
Grimbold wrote:
Sorry Ken , it was not meant on your comment. It was on the article written in a language that 99.9% of the readersdo not understand.
on September 21,2013 | 01:24PM
DiverDave wrote:
Correct Grimbold, But that is what they want, to talk only to those less than 1%ers. Solis and company could easily put a English version here too. But does not want to for the same reason the Kawaihuelani Center at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa refused to cooperate with the Google Translate folks. They want to control the language so that they control the message without the majority of the folks knowing what they are saying.
on September 22,2013 | 07:58AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Kekeha Solis correctly points out that there are two opposing viewpoints AMONG ETHNIC HAWAIIANS regarding the mural. But Solis ignores the views of people with no Hawaiian blood, as though the only views that matter are those of ethnic Hawaiians. In a multiracial society, everyone has a right to express an opinion and to participate actively in deciding what the government's policy should be regarding a work of art bought and paid for by the government and displayed in a government building.

From the fact that there are two different views among ethnic Hawaiians, we can see that it is incorrect to say that the mural is offensive to ethnic Hawaiians. But even if ethnic Hawaiians were all offended by the mural, that should not settle the matter; because the entire community including the other 80% have a right to participate in making the decision.


on September 21,2013 | 12:01PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Kekeha Solis correctly points out that there are two opposing viewpoints AMONG ETHNIC HAWAIIANS regarding the mural. But Solis ignores the views of people with no Hawaiian blood, as though the only views that matter are those of ethnic Hawaiians. In a multiracial society, everyone has a right to express an opinion and to participate actively in deciding what the government's policy should be regarding a work of art bought and paid for by the government and displayed in a government building.
on September 21,2013 | 12:02PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
From the fact that there are two different views among ethnic Hawaiians, we can see that it is incorrect to say that the mural is offensive to ethnic Hawaiians. But even if ethnic Hawaiians were all offended by the mural, that should not settle the matter; because the entire community including the other 80% have a right to participate in making the decision.
on September 21,2013 | 12:02PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
The synopsis asks only one question: Did the artist never intend “to disrespect anyone, especially the Hawaiian community”?" But Solis doesn't really discuss that question, so the synopsis is misleading. First, neither Solis nor I nor anyone else can read the mind of the artist to know whether he intended to disrespect anyone. But even if the artist did intentionally disrespect the ethnic Hawaiian community, he would have a perfect right to do so, because we all have freedom of expression. To deny the artist freedom of expression is to impose censorship. Artists, poets, and writers are given special latitude in our society to express views that might be controversial or offensive, because it's good for society (and every part and component of society) to be subjected to criticism.
on September 21,2013 | 12:02PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
If Solis wants to ask what were the motives of the artist, and whether the artist intended to disrespect the ethnic Hawaiian community, then we should also ask what were the motives of Paulette Kaleikini, and whether she intended to disrespect the rights we all have. This is the third major situation in the last couple of years where this one person has had a major impact in disrupting ongoing projects by asserting "special rights" for ethnic Hawaiians, that everyone else should be forced to bow down to obey whatever rules Kaleikini thinks the "Hawaiian community" holds sacred. Is Kaleikini sincere in her beliefs? Probably. I'll give her the benefit of the doubt, because all three of her adventures have focused on "sacred bones" -- Kawaiaha'o Church construction projects where the church unearthed burials and wanted to move them; the railroad project which had not done a thorough environmental impact review to see if burials would be disturbed; and now the "bones" displayed in the Convention Center mural (although the bones in the mural are not anatomically correct and there's nothing about the bones that makes them identifiable as native bones). But I don't care whether Kaleikini was sincere or whether the artist was sincere. I do care that we must not allow any individual or group to force everyone else to obey their rules simply because they say they have religious beliefs which we are violating and causing them to feel disrespected.
on September 21,2013 | 12:03PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
By the way, congratulations to Kekeha Solis who seems to now respect the wishes of people not to be offended by having their names butchered and Hawaiianized. I see in his essay the unmolested names of Mike McCartney and Hans Ladislaus. Unfortunately Solis continues to molest the names of places and artworks. For example the artwork under discussion is "Forgotten Inheritance" which Solis translates as “Ka Waiwai Ho'oilina Poina 'Ia”. But Solis first names it with the translated Hawaiian name and then puts the correct, original English name afterward, in parentheses -- it should be the other way around. He also renames the Hawaii Convention Center as "Kikowaena Mālama 'Aha o Hawai'i" but the original, correct English name does not appear anywhere, not even in parentheses. Solis says McCartney is President of something called "Ke'ena Mana Ho'omāka'ika'i o Hawai'i" which, of course, is the Hawaii Tourism Authority; but poor old Mike would probably not know that. But hey, progress is progress; and I thank Kekeha Solis on behalf of Mike McCartney and Hans Ladislaus for respecting the integrity of their names.
on September 21,2013 | 01:04PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
By the way, congratulations to Kekeha Solis who seems to now respect the wishes of people not to be offended by having their names butchered and Hawaiianized. I see in his essay the unmolested names of Mike McCartney and Hans Ladislaus. Unfortunately Solis continues to molest the names of places and artworks. For example the artwork under discussion is "Forgotten Inheritance" which Solis translates as “Ka Waiwai Ho'oilina Poina 'Ia”. But Solis first names it with the translated Hawaiian name and then puts the correct, original English name afterward, in parentheses -- it should be the other way around. He also renames the Hawaii Convention Center as "Kikowaena Mālama 'Aha o Hawai'i" but the original, correct English name does not appear anywhere, not even in parentheses. Solis says McCartney is President of something called "Ke'ena Mana Ho'omāka'ika'i o Hawai'i" which, of course, is the Hawaii Tourism Authority; but poor old Mike would probably not know that. But hey, progress is progress; and I thank Kekeha Solis on behalf of Mike McCartney and Hans Ladislaus for respecting the integrity of their names.
on September 22,2013 | 05:14AM
DiverDave wrote:
I think you give Solis too much credit Dr. Conklin. Solis probably couldn't figure out how to translate Hans Ladislaus into Polynesian-Hawaiian, so he had to just leave it alone.
on September 22,2013 | 08:24AM
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