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Thursday, December 18, 2014         

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Internments can happen again, Scalia warns

The longest-serving member of the U.S. Supreme Court talks at two isle schools

By Audrey McAvoy / Associated Press

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia told law students at the University of Hawaii law school Monday that the nation's highest court was wrong to uphold the internment of Japa­nese-Americans during World War II but that he wouldn't be surprised if the court issued a similar ruling during a future conflict.

Scalia was responding to a question about the court's 1944 decision in Kore­ma­tsu v. United States, which upheld the convictions of Gordon Hira­ba­ya­shi and Fred Kore­ma­tsu for violating an order to report to an internment camp.

"Well, of course, Kore­ma­tsu was wrong. And I think we have repudiated in a later case. But you are kidding yourself if you think the same thing will not happen again," Scalia told students and faculty during a lunchtime question-and-answer session.

Scalia cited a Latin expression meaning "In times of war, the laws fall silent."

"That's what was going on — the panic about the war and the invasion of the Pacific and whatnot. That's what happens. It was wrong, but I would not be surprised to see it happen again, in time of war. It's no justification but it is the reality," he said.

Avi Soifer, the law school's dean, said he believed Scalia was suggesting people always have to be vigilant and that the law alone can't be trusted to provide protection.

Soifer said it was good to hear Scalia say the Kore­ma­tsu ruling was wrong, adding that the justice has been among those who have reined in the power of military commissions regardless of the administration.

"We do need a court that sometimes will say there are individual or group rights that are not being adequately protected by the democratic process," Soifer said.

Scalia was appointed to the nation's highest court in 1986, making him the longest-serving justice currently on the court.

The 77-year-old spoke after teaching a class. He didn't take questions from media.

Before appearing at the law school, Scalia held a "talk story" session with 54 St. Andrew's Priory juniors and seniors in the Queen Emma Library of the school's Kennedy Hall.






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