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APEC HAWAII SUMMIT


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'Remove barriers,' Clinton urges

"U.S. firms want fair opportunities," the top American envoy says during a speech

By William Cole

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 04:00 a.m. HST, Nov 11, 2011


Secretary of State Hillary Clinton provided the first public comments from a high-ranking official at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, saying America's prosperity is tied to the region and pledging stepped-up economic, diplomatic and military emphasis in the East.

"What will happen in Asia in the years ahead will have an enormous impact on our nation's future, and we cannot afford to sit on the sidelines and leave it to others to determine our future for us," Clinton told nearly 300 invited guests Thursday at the East-West Center.

Clinton said the 20th century saw the United States play a central role in shaping a network of relations across the Atlantic, and "we are now doing the same across the Pacific."

"It is becoming increasingly clear that in the 21st century the world's strategic and economic center of gravity will be the Asia Pacific, from the Indian subcontinent to the western shores of the Americas," Clinton said on the lanai of the Imin Center.

As a member of APEC and host for the summit, the United States will drive an agenda focused on strengthening regional economic integration, promoting "green" growth and advancing regulatory cooperation, Clinton said.

Clinton, who spoke Thursday morning, also called for a greater investment in the "economic potential of women, whose talents and contribution still often go untapped."

"We have to remove barriers, both at borders and behind borders, barriers like corruption, the theft of intellectual property, government practices that distort fair competition," Clinton added. "Economic integration must be a two-way street."

A good portion of that message was directed at China, and Clinton noted how the two countries are inextricably linked economically, saying a "thriving China is good for China, and a thriving China is good for America."

"U.S. firms want fair opportunities to export to China's markets and a level playing field for competition," she said. "Chinese firms want to buy more high-tech products from us, make more investments in our country and be accorded the same terms of access that market economies enjoy."

Clinton also took China to task on human rights issues.

"When we see reports of lawyers, artists and others who are detained or disappeared, the United States speaks up both publicly and privately," she said.

Clinton said the U.S. is "alarmed" by recent incidents in Tibet of young people lighting themselves on fire in protest.

Among the pacts being sought during APEC is a nine-country trade agreement known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The U.S. will be placing special emphasis on engaging with treaty allies Japan, South Korea, Australia, the Philippines and Thailand, Clinton said.

Three student fellows at the East-West Center asked Clinton questions, and Mian Cui, who is from China, asked about foreign students studying in the U.S.

Clinton said a program now seeks to get more American students studying in China, and more Chinese students coming to the U.S. The same program also is in place with other countries, she said, and efforts are being made to make it easier to come to the U.S. and stay after getting an education.

Later Thursday, Clinton held bilateral meetings with officials from Japan, China and Australia.

Gov. Neil Abercrombie, one of those in attendance for Clinton's speech, said he is "very pleased" that the focus is back on Asia and the Pacific.

"Our whole emphasis has been that Hawaii is the anchor for the Asia-Pacific region," Abercrombie said. "We're no longer being thought of as the crossroads -- some place to pass through. We want to be a destination for people thinking throughout the Asia-Pacific region about what Hawaii can provide."

U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, D-Hawaii, who is on the House Armed Services Committee, said "the Pacific is the theater of the future, and Hawaii has the most critical role to play in the Pacific."

Hanabusa, who also took in Clinton's speech, said the U.S. military "is no longer, in my opinion, a forward-deployed force that we're looking at. It's not just (a force that's) going to go to combat. The military is what enables economic growth, plus the diplomatic stability in the area by its presence."

Hawaii News Now video: Clinton addresses APEC gathering






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HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Per the photograph, when Hillary towers over Neil, I think we need to "think" what were we "thinking". LOL. Let me read their body language. Neil's body language is saying: "Oh Please, take me back, I want to finish my Career in Congress. And Hillary is replying, now, now Neil, you wanted that gig, you stay with it, you little boy."
on November 11,2011 | 01:54AM
Highinthesierras wrote:
OR PERHAPS SHE IS SAYING - I keep telling Barry, "it's the economy stupid," but we keep flying around the world accomplishing nothing. Why we don't stay in Washington and work on the nation's joblessness is beyond me. Bill keeps telling me to challenge him in the primary, but I would have to get back in shape, and with all this traveling, I don't know.
on November 11,2011 | 06:10AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
u near Reno?
on November 11,2011 | 09:55AM
livinginhawaii wrote:
Remove barriers? What a joke. These people are all about barriers. Look what they have done to Waikiki...
on November 11,2011 | 04:11AM
Lanikaula wrote:
"We have to remove barriers, both at borders and behind borders, barriers like corruption, the theft of intellectual property, government practices that distort fair competition," Clinton added. They should start with ALL the over-kill of the Police barriers, barricades, closures, da 'stink-eye' they're giving to the Hawaii public and the hefty price of 'admission' to this exclusionary 'conference' of elitist foreign corporations! So much for "never the twain shall meet." But we knew that already long before america capitalistic expansion in the Pacific. So where's the REAL Aloha?
on November 11,2011 | 04:14AM
JPM wrote:
If our President had to be a Democrat, I wish it would have been Clinton. She has all the experience and connections we need. The Democrats and media really made a mistake pushing their agenda. A woman would have been just as historical, and even more because she would have succeeded. Instead we got a community organizer falsely thinking we care he is abroad. It has been peaceful, and I am sure he is one of the barriers she is referencing.
on November 11,2011 | 06:15AM
Benibiker wrote:
If only we could have had Clinton as president...
on November 11,2011 | 07:22AM
Anonymous wrote:
Corollary: If this can happen to Hoku, that is to say Bankruptcy and the broken promises of job creation in Hawaii, then imagine on a scale like maybe hundreds of times bigger than Hoku, what may happen to our Financial Creditworthiness as a State of Hawaii and in particular as a City and County of Honolulu, when this boondoggle starts rolling back and forth between Kapolei and Honolulu. You know what I am talking about, right??? Do we need to start laying off Police Officers when we cannot get any money to run our City. ANSWER THAT, MISTER PETER CARLISLE, AND MISTER MUFI HANNEMANN. Ben Cayetano, stay on the side here and just listen. Now..... ANWSER :
on November 11,2011 | 07:28AM
Anonymous wrote:
Corollary: If this can happen to Hoku, that is to say Bankruptcy and the broken promises of job creation in Hawaii, then imagine on a scale like maybe hundreds of times bigger than Hoku, what may happen to our Financial Creditworthiness as a State of Hawaii and in particular as a City and County of Honolulu, when this boondoggle starts rolling back and forth between Kapolei and Honolulu. You know what I am talking about, right??? Do we need to start laying off Police Officers when we cannot get any money to run our City. ANSWER THAT, MISTER PETER CARLISLE, AND MISTER MUFI HANNEMANN. Ben Cayetano, stay on the side here and just listen. Now..... ANWSER :
on November 11,2011 | 07:29AM
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on November 11,2011 | 07:31AM
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on November 11,2011 | 07:32AM
Kapakahi wrote:

I recommend people seek out Clinton's recent major policy statement on America's stance towards Asia. It was published a few weeks ago in the journal, Foreign Policy.

But even from the few comments available here, her meaning is clear. The United States intends to dominate the Asia Pacific region through an increased military presence and intends to knock down any barriers the governments of Asia might create to protect themselves from American corporate domination. "We are here, we are staying, we insist on being central to any regional decision-making and we will never leave."

It may be time to dust off that old-fashioned word, "imperialism." Not the older direct kind of colonialism where the US, the Europeans and the Japanese seized and occupied entire countries. But the American approach to Latin America for much of the 20th century, where we would set up puppet client regimes, impose unequal treaties upon them with our over-powering military might as a threat and extract from their countries everything worth owning.

Foreigners find a beautiful beach in some tropical country? The APEC-WTO model will bar restrictions on foreign ownership. All desirable places to live will be transferred to the foreigner with the fattest wallet. This is the direction the world economy is headed. The APEC-WTO approach will speed it up, so the transfers happen quickly, well before each areas local inhabitant wake up and organize to stop the integration--nay, the DESTRUCTION--of their way of life.


on November 11,2011 | 07:50AM
kauakea wrote:
What has happened to her hair lately? It looks messy and, worse yet, she's back to the headband look she had during Bill's first presidential campaign.
on November 11,2011 | 07:52AM
Anonymous wrote:
Abercrombie's posture is horrible. He looks like the lilliputian hunch back of Notre Dame.
on November 11,2011 | 09:26AM
sukebesan wrote:
How about removing the physical barriers and road closures on the H-1 freeway, around the Hawaii Convention Center and Waikiki first!
on November 11,2011 | 09:34AM
Kuniarr wrote:
Indeed Hilary Clinton's push for fair trade with China if successful would perk up US economy because the ultimate result would be a huge increase in US exports and balance US trade with China. Our exports to China has a gargantuan lag behind our imports from China. The removal of barriers for US export industries would increase US exports to China and balance US-China trade.
on November 11,2011 | 10:15AM
Changalang wrote:
"The Trilateral Commission is a non-governmental, non-partisan discussion group founded by David Rockefeller in July 1973 to foster closer cooperation among the United States, Europe and Japan." The Trilateral Commission is a Council on Foreign Relations front group "officially" established in 1973, but there is evidence that it was created years before. Its founder and primary financial engine was international financier, David Rockefeller, longtime chairman of the Rockefeller family-controlled Chase Manhattan Bank and undisputed overlord of his family’s global corporate empire. Rockefeller’s idea for establishing the commission emerged after he had read a book entitled Between Two Ages written by an Establishment scholar, Prof. Zbigniew Brzezinski of Columbia University. In his book Brzezinski proposed a vast alliance between North America, Western Europe and Japan. According to Brzezinski, changes in the modern world required it.
on November 11,2011 | 06:34PM
Changalang wrote:
Addendum: "Resist as it might," Brzezinski wrote elsewhere, "the American system is compelled gradually to accommodate itself to this emerging international context, with the U.S. government called upon to negotiate, to guarantee, and, to some extent, to protect the various arrangements that have been contrived even by private business."..........So far the New World Order sure has a lot of Americans living in a lower quality of life. Nice to know our taxpayer dollars are funding Rockefeller's "utopia" worldwide. Winning !?
on November 11,2011 | 06:37PM
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