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North, South Korea on alert after deadly artillery attack

By Associated Press

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 04:45 p.m. HST, Nov 23, 2010


INCHEON, South Korea >> North and South Korea exchanged artillery fire along their disputed frontier, raising tensions between the rivals to their highest level in more than a decade. The communist nation warned of more military strikes if the South encroaches on the maritime border by "even 0.001 millimeter."

The skirmish began Tuesday when North Korea warned the South to halt military drills near their sea border, according to South Korean officials. When Seoul refused and began firing artillery into disputed waters — but away from the North Korean shore — the North retaliated by shelling the small island of Yeonpyeong, which houses South Korean military installations and a small civilian population.

Seoul responded by unleashing its own barrage from K-9 155mm self-propelled howitzers and scrambling fighter jets. Two South Korean marines were killed in the shelling that also injured 15 troops and three civilians. Officials in Seoul said there could be considerable North Korean casualties.

President Barack Obama pledged that the U.S. would defend South Korea after what the White House branded a provocative, outrageous attack by North Korea on its neighbor. "South Korea is our ally. It has been since the Korean war," Obama said in his first comments about the North Korean shelling. "And we strongly affirm our commitment to defend South Korea as part of that alliance."

Trying to avoid any escalation in the situation, the U.S. did not reposition any of its 29,000 troops in the South. Obama, speaking to ABC News, would not speculate when asked about military options. He was expected to telephone South Korean President Lee Myung-bak late Tuesday night. 

The top U.S. military officer in South Korea, Gen. Walter Sharp, condemned North Korea's "unprovoked" artillery attack in a statement Wednesday and called on the North to abide by the armistice that ended the 1950-53 Korean War.

"These actions are threatening the peace and stability of the entire region," said Sharp, who commands U.S. forces in South Korea as well as the U.S.-led UN Command.

The confrontation lasted about an hour and left the uneasiest of calms, with each side threatening further bombardments.

North Korea's apparent progress in its nuclear weapons program and its preparations for handing power to a new generation have plunged relations on the heavily militarized peninsula to new lows in recent weeks.

South Korea's military was put on high alert after the shelling — one of the rivals' most dramatic confrontations since an armistice halted the Korean War in 1953 and one of the few to put civilians at risk.

"I thought I would die," said Lee Chun-ok, 54, an islander who said she was watching TV in her home when the shelling began. Suddenly, a wall and door collapsed.

"I was really, really terrified," she told The Associated Press after being evacuated to the port city of Incheon, west of Seoul, "and I'm still terrified."

The attacks focused global attention on the tiny island and sent stock prices down worldwide.

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, who convened an emergency security meeting shortly after the initial bombardment, said an "indiscriminate attack on civilians can never be tolerated."

"Enormous retaliation should be made to the extent that (North Korea) cannot make provocations again," he said. 






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