Quantcast

Friday, October 24, 2014         

 Print   Email   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

Twin NASA craft launched to study insides of moon

By Marcia Dunn

AP Aerospace Writer

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 09:49 a.m. HST, Sep 10, 2011


CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. >> A pair of spacecraft rocketed toward the moon Saturday on the first mission dedicated to measuring lunar gravity and determining what's inside Earth's orbiting companion — all the way down to the core.

"I could hardly be happier," said the lead scientist, Maria Zuber. After two days of delays and almost another, "I was trying to be as calm as I could be."

NASA launched the near identical probes — named Grail-A and Grail-B — aboard a relatively small Delta II rocket to save money. It will take close to four months for the spacecraft to reach the moon, a long, roundabout journey compared with the zippy three-day trip of the Apollo astronauts four decades ago.

Grail-A popped off the upper stage of the rocket exactly as planned 1½ hours after liftoff, followed eight minutes later by Grail-B. Both releases were seen live on NASA TV thanks to an on-board rocket camera, and generated loud applause in Launch Control.

The spacecraft are traveling independently to the moon, with A arriving on New Year's Eve and B on New Year's Day.

Once they were safely on their way, Zuber announced a contest for schoolchildren to replace the "working-class names" of Grail-A and Grail-B.

"Grail, simply put, is a journey to the center of the moon," said Ed Weiler, head of NASA's science mission directorate, borrowing from the title of the Jules Verne science fiction classic, "Journey to the Center of the Earth."






 Print   Email   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

IN OTHER NEWS
Breaking News
Blogs
Political Radar
Plus 7

Political Radar
Important

Political Radar
Important

Island Crafters
Weekend Happenings

Small Talk
Handcuffs

Political Radar
Sued