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Oahu-bound flight with engine trouble diverted to San Francisco

By Associated Press

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 11:35 a.m. HST, Mar 19, 2012



A Hawaiian Airlines flight from Oakland, Calif., landed in Honolulu after engine trouble diverted the plane to San Francisco.

The Honolulu-bound plane was about 20 minutes into the flight on Sunday morning when pilots noticed an indication of engine trouble. Hawaiian Airlines spokeswoman Ann Botticelli says the engine did not shut down and the pilot landed in San Francisco, which was the closest airport.

The 203 passengers were bused back to Oakland. Those in the Oakland area had the option of returning home while others were given hotel rooms. They were given meal vouchers and a $300 travel credit.

They departed on a 1:30 a.m. Monday flight and arrived in Honolulu at about 4 a.m.







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peanutgallery wrote:
This is a incredible story. No news about what happened to the engine? Is Hawaiian Airlines giving refunds to all future flyer's who don't think their maintenance is up to snuff? Does the FAA have any kind of mandate for the amount of time that can lapse before an airline is forced to produce evidence of the malfunction? I swear people have gotten just like sheep. Try calling Hawaiian Airlines and ask what happened to this plane. The flying public deserves better. Much better. Ticket prices are through the roof, yet the airlines treat people like dirt.
on March 19,2012 | 12:02PM
kailua1980 wrote:
What competing airline do YOU work for? Or, what rule did you violate at HAL that forced them to let YOU go? Goodness...do your homework before you lash out at Hawaiian or any other airline for that matter. ALL commercial passenger aircraft that fly across the oceans with just two engines are ETOPS certified, which basically means the plane could have made it anywhere it needs to on ONE engine, and there are very strict FAA (and organizations) rules regarding the maintenance and certification of what planes earn the ETOPS designation. HALs long-distance planes are 767s and A330s. Both are ETOPS certified and besides, the "malfunctioning" engine did not shut down. For all we know it could have just been a burned-out indicator light in the cockpit and the pilots just decided to play it safe by landing the plane in SFO. I think the flight crew and the airline itself should be commended. It seems as if the passengers were very well taken care of, no one was ever in any danger, accomodations were arranged for those who needed it, and they were given credit for future travel. What more could Hawaiian be expected to do? This example is why I choose to fly Hawaiian exclusively, and tell all my family and friends to do the same.
on March 19,2012 | 12:45PM
sloturle wrote:
I not riding Hawaiian I riding Aloha
on March 19,2012 | 01:40PM
E_Ogawa wrote:
What does, ". . . noticed an indication of engine trouble" mean or imply? If this incident were shortly after take-off, I would think bird strike, but since the engine continued operating, it sounds more like a deficient indicator light. I also think this story has been "varnished" by someone because the AP normally doesn't do such a crap job at reporting a story. No interviews with passengers, no deeper insight into the incident?
on March 19,2012 | 02:57PM
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