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Driver in racing death commits suicide before sentencing

By Nelson Daranciang

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 04:09 p.m. HST, Mar 28, 2012


One of two motorists accused of causing the tragic death of an 11-year-old Waimanalo boy in 2010 was supposed to get sentenced for manslaughter this morning in state court.

However, the court canceled the hearing after discovering that the defendant, Herbert Kaio-Campbell, had apparently committed suicide Monday.

Honolulu police said Kaio-Campbell, 21, was found at his residence in Waimanalo Monday morning. City Emergency Medical Services personnel went to the home where Kaio-Campbell was pronounced dead.

Police said there were no signs of foul play and have classified the case as an unattended death.

Kaio-Campbell, 21, pleaded no contest in January to manslaughter in connection with the July 25, 2010, death of Samuel Kassebeer.

Police said Kaio-Campbell and Travis Murray were racing on Kalanianaole Highway when Kaio-Campbell crashed into a car in which Kassebeer was riding. The crash happened in front of Kassebeer's Waimanalo home.

Murray is scheduled to stand trial for manslaughter in May.

City prosecutors said  at the time of the crash Kaio-Campbell had a blood-alcohol content of 0.10.  

Police said the two drivers were leapfrogging each other in no-passing zones when Kaio-Campbell slammed into a car making a left turn in front of him. Kaio-Campbell's car was traveling 77 mph at the time of the impact, prosecutors said.

The impact ejected Kassebeer, who was the back-seat passenger, and Eunice "Ming Toi" Goo, who was a front-seat passenger.

Two months before the crash the Honolulu Fire Department had awarded Kaio-Campbell with a civilian medal of valor for rescuing a swimmer from rough surf.






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loquaciousone wrote:
This is so sad. This young man lost his future and his life because of a moment of bad judgement. Something that happens too often in young adults who are transitioning into the real world where there is no reset button to start over.
on March 28,2012 | 11:58AM
patk wrote:
Well said, this certainly was a good young man who made a poor decision just as many other people do when young. Unfortunately, his actions had tragic consequences.
on March 28,2012 | 02:03PM
kainalu wrote:
Young people ... anyone for that matter, make decisions all the time that they regret. Including, or should I say, especially some of those making unwarranted shameful posts in this thread. Our condolences to all involved. "Cheap way out" and "coward" - yeah - sure.
on March 28,2012 | 04:45PM
Manapua_Man wrote:
Yes agree with you, unfortunately, most times there are no second chances in these cases. People need to realize that life is not like a "Mario Kart" video game where you get to start over again after crashing.
on March 28,2012 | 05:40PM
Grimbold wrote:
Cheap way out. I bet he was not sober. He could have done a lot of good deeds and restitution in the rest of his life.
on March 28,2012 | 12:07PM
surfergirl96786 wrote:
What a coward.
on March 28,2012 | 12:18PM
Kokoy wrote:
I don't think he was a coward in respect to serving jail time, I think that he was overcome with grief from causing the death of an 11 year old. It's unfortunate that those surrounding him didn't seek help for him. Although nothing will bring back the life of Samuel, Kaio-Campbell still had a chance to turn his life around and work as a community spokesperson (from prison of course).
on March 28,2012 | 12:27PM
Oahuan wrote:
I believe she meant he's a coward for not facing that grief and the torture of living knowing he took someones life the way he did. Instead he took the "easy way out" and that in itself is cowardly.
on March 28,2012 | 12:33PM
FrankieT wrote:
You don't know that! He could have had some mental problems he needed help with. Bottom line tragic for both sides. Both families have suffered. You should keep your mouth shut. Shame on you
on March 28,2012 | 12:31PM
blkdrgn wrote:
In this case he was. He was brave enough to risk his own life to save another. Then he made the choice to drink and drive and to race illegally. That was his choice and I don't believe that he had a mental problem to make him do that. Now that he killed someone you telling me that only now he has a mental problem so he took his life? He took his own life because he was a coward and couldn't man up for the consequences. Shame on you for feeling sorry for him. Yes feel sorry for the families but not him.
on March 28,2012 | 12:53PM
soshaljustic wrote:
Sorry blkdrgn, but frankiet is spot on-seems the guy had mental problems not treated, probably should have been. Had a history of major impulsive and life/death risky behaviors. I do believe he felt every bit of guilt and remorse for his actions, the death and trauma he put people through. A hero one moment and the bottom of the heap the next. I am sure he felt that ultimate drop as though he lived his live within that short span of time and had no more to offer the world. Of course nothing could have been further from the truth and this is where he needed help, rather than just the punitive measures he was going through. This is tragic for ALL concerned. It is not about "Manning Up." An educated person would know such things, please enroll in higher education as soon as possible. Preferably some psychological course work with a side of sociology. When your eyebrows are gray, have macular degeneration and can woman up with the best of us old educated ladies u just may understand.
on March 28,2012 | 08:07PM
loquaciousone wrote:
Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones.
on March 28,2012 | 12:36PM
kaupani wrote:
If I kill someone and then kill myself before facing the ramifications of my irresponsible actions, then you can use that bunk "throwing stones, glass houses, etc". Otherwise, I'd say it seems likely this guy was simply afraid of facing up to his responsibility; if he was so overwrought with pain for what he has done, he would have killed himself long ago. Cheap way out.
on March 28,2012 | 01:18PM
loquaciousone wrote:
Anger and hate are very corrosive. Get it all out before it eats you from the inside out.
on March 28,2012 | 01:39PM
jimmyhouse67 wrote:
I never raced and killed somebody so yes, I will throw stones. Stupidity caused the death of an innocent child and lack of courage caused him to take his own life.
on March 28,2012 | 06:49PM
Hapa_Haole_Boy wrote:
Bruddah here said it best. Ditto that.
on March 29,2012 | 02:45PM
fishwrider wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on March 28,2012 | 06:30PM
soundofreason wrote:
Signed.........fishwrider
on March 28,2012 | 06:50PM
nodaddynotthebelt wrote:
I don't think he was a coward to commit suicide. Many who think suicide is for cowards don't know what they are talking about. Most people would be afraid to fatally shoot or stab themselves let alone suffocate themselves. He probably felt really bad about what he did and couldn't live with himself. He rescued a swimmer and that shows valor. I don't agree with what he did but give the guy a break. It is easy to say someone is a coward for committing suicide. Many who commit suicide and are actually not cowardly.
on March 28,2012 | 11:11PM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
It is a 35 MPH zone, going 77 MPH, under the influence, racing: if this island is too small for you, please move to the mainland.
on March 28,2012 | 12:23PM
kprtyqn wrote:
People should be responsible for their actions no matter what. Its just escaping what should have been the right thing to do....make up for your choice. Sad it had to be this way tho...
on March 28,2012 | 12:34PM
cojef wrote:
Alcohol makes a person macho! Sad as it seem, 2 lives lost because of impatience in growing up. Classic example of young people acting out, trying to be adults and more often then not fail and end up losing their lives and causing others to do the same. Tragedy for both families, my heart go to them.
on March 28,2012 | 12:57PM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
My dad was an alcoholic and we are considered adult children of an alcoholic. He drank and smoked himself to death, dying in 1991 at the young age of 62. As we were growing up, we did not know what was going on, except I guess my dad wanted to live the American Dream with a nice house with picket fences and an all american family. I could go on and on.
on March 28,2012 | 02:39PM
Tahitigirl55 wrote:
This is sad - I can see where this maybe bother him because like loquaciousone mentioned - bad judgement at the wrong time. Maybe he ended his life because he knew what he had done was unforgiveable and he also lives in Waimanalo. To face a family that you took a life from I too would rather end mine. No a coward - just human. Yes, he could have helped out the community if this didn't happen but it was choices and he made a bad one. I feel for his family.
on March 28,2012 | 12:36PM
sweetness613 wrote:
i agree with Tahiti girl, so hard to live with your self after taking someone's life like that. Not coward at all.
on March 28,2012 | 12:56PM
saveparadise wrote:
Nicely said Tahitigirl55. This was a sad closure for all involved. So many die in vain due to alchohol related deaths. It's like no one is paying heed to the tragedies involved with drinking because they think that something like this will not happen to them.
on March 28,2012 | 01:05PM
Compassionate_Cat wrote:
Life requires courage and hope and forgiveness. I know that if he could have held on he could have been a prime example of turning one's life around. God bless the Kaio's, Campbells, the Kassebeer families and hold up the other young man Travis Murray to embrace the comfort and forgiveness that only God can give.
on March 28,2012 | 12:50PM
saveparadise wrote:
Agreed. Aloha.
on March 28,2012 | 01:07PM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
He felt the guilt.
on March 28,2012 | 02:41PM
loquaciousone wrote:
I can relate to this young man and many others like him whose lapses in judgement forever changed their lives. As a teen I had many lapses but I was lucky because my lolo moments did not end in any fatalities or injuries.
on March 28,2012 | 01:01PM
Wazdat wrote:
Well at least the taxpayers wont have to foot his bill for prison.
on March 28,2012 | 01:51PM
steveoctober wrote:
He wouldn't have served much time in prison with a manslaughter charge so hardly an issue there. In fact, I bet he already knew what his sentence was going to be, piped through his attorney, and realized he couldn't live with getting away with such a small slap on the wrist.
on March 28,2012 | 02:52PM
HD36 wrote:
Although he took a life, unintentionally, he also saved a life, at the same time risking his own. Not a cowardly act.
on March 28,2012 | 02:43PM
RetiredUSMC wrote:
Two families destroyed !
on March 28,2012 | 03:33PM
808warriorfan wrote:
Could be it was his way of saying "sorry" to the Kassebeer Family; we'll never know
on March 28,2012 | 04:30PM
kais1269 wrote:
How completely tactless to post his picture. The guy made a mistake. And now he killed himself. Everyone happy?
on March 28,2012 | 04:30PM
Waipahunokaoi wrote:
Very sad on so many levels. RIP
on March 28,2012 | 04:50PM
kameleokalani44 wrote:
All I see here is grief. This tragety just was compounded by this suicide. Does anyone remember that the boy's mother and Kaio-Campbell were classmates? I should think that would add an extra heavy burden on him. I didn't know Samuel's family but my grandson played football with him. This whole thing has haunted me for a long time. Kaio-Campbell didn't seem like a bad person, just made a horrible mistake he couldn't live with. All I can say, is how sad this whole incident is. But people don't learn, do they. They still drink and drive......and there will be more Samuels and more Kaio-Campbells. Just hope none of you hardhearted people find yourselves in this situation.
on March 28,2012 | 04:53PM
jimmyhouse67 wrote:
How were they classmates? She would have had to have been 9 or 10 years old when she had Samuel. That doesn't add up.
on March 28,2012 | 06:52PM
Ambergris23 wrote:
There are no winners in street racing...
on March 28,2012 | 04:56PM
ValriLei wrote:
It is unfortunate that two people had to die for one persons mistake.
on March 28,2012 | 06:10PM
hanabatadayz wrote:
he was facing 20 years in prison..yeah he took the coward way out
on March 28,2012 | 09:05PM
Changalang wrote:
The timing of his sentencing had everything to do with the timing in which he decided to take his own life, for that is where convicted criminals are remanded to custody for incarceration. No winners in this sad piece of news.
on March 28,2012 | 09:52PM
tiki886 wrote:
Cayetano pardoned Tom Foley, a fellow attorney, who killed a 33 year old man and injured his wife while his blood alcohol was three times over the legal limit. The judge gave him 10 years. The parole board reduced the minimum eligibility for parole to 6 years, then to 4 years. The victim's family received remuneration from Foley and then the family asked the court he deserves a pardon and Cayetano pardon Foley. Foley spent 2 years in jail for negligent homicide while under the influence of alcohol. Moral of the story? If you're going to kill someone while under the influence of alcohol, make sure your buddy can give you a pardon and you have money to buy off the victim's family. Google the names for the full story.
on March 28,2012 | 11:06PM
tiki886 wrote:
Cayetano pardoned Tom Foley, a fellow attorney, who killed a 33 year old man and injured his wife while his blood alcohol was three times over the legal limit. The judge gave him 10 years. The parole board reduced the minimum eligibility for parole to 6 years, then to 4 years. The victim's family received remuneration from Foley and then the family asked the court he deserves a pardon and Cayetano pardon Foley. Foley spent 2 years in jail for negligent homicide while under the influence of alcohol. Moral of the story? If you're going to kill someone while under the influence of alcohol, make sure your buddy can give you a pardon and you have money to buy off the victim's family. Google the names for the full story.
on March 28,2012 | 11:09PM
tiki886 wrote:
Cayetano pardoned Tom Foley, a fellow attorney, who killed a 33 year old man and injured his wife while his blood alcohol was three times over the legal limit. The judge gave him 10 years. The parole board reduced the minimum eligibility for parole to 6 years, then to 4 years. The victim's family received remuneration from Foley and then the family asked the court he deserves a pardon and Cayetano pardon Foley. Foley spent 2 years in jail for negligent homicide while under the influence of alcohol. Moral of the story? If you're going to killl someone while under the influence of alcohol, make sure your buddy can give you a pardon and you have money to buy off the victim's family. Google the names for the full story.
on March 28,2012 | 11:10PM
tiki886 wrote:
Anyone care to make any comparisons between Foley and Kaio-Campbell?
on March 28,2012 | 11:12PM
Changalang wrote:
Is your point that Foley should have offed himself too? Or, are you just digging up some opposition research for the August election to see how well it flies?
on March 28,2012 | 11:36PM
tiki886 wrote:
I'm a one issue guy when it comes to rail. That's why I'm voting for Ben. But this article came to mind when I considered the irony of the inconsistencies of justice and the bad decisions that people make in life and in politics.
on March 29,2012 | 10:15AM
kailua000 wrote:
I dont think he was a coward in any way. I bet when he jumped in the water to save that young woman in Makapuu no one else did (besides his brother), and I'm betting a lot of people just watched. Cowards and bad people dont save lives. I think he probably felt so guilty for taking that boys life he couldn't deal with it. He was just a kid himself when it happened and its tragic. Very sad and I hope others learn from it.
on March 29,2012 | 03:59AM
Living_Large wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on March 29,2012 | 11:21AM
nalogirl wrote:
What? Ignorant remark.
on March 29,2012 | 01:24PM
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