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Report: Ex-PSU president OK'd not reporting abuse

By Associated Press

POSTED:


STATE COLLEGE, Pa. >>  Emails show Penn State's former president Graham Spanier agreed not to take allegations of sex abuse against ex-assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky to authorities but worried university officials would be "vulnerable" for failing to report it, a news organization has reported.

CNN says the emails, first obtained by and reported on by NBC, followed a graduate assistant's 2001 report of seeing Sandusky sexually assaulting a boy in a team locker room shower.

The emails show athletic director Tim Curley and retired vice president Gary Schultz intended to report the allegation, then reconsidered. Spanier responded that he was "supportive" of their plan, but he worried they might "become vulnerable for not having reported it."

Sandusky was convicted this month of 45 counts of sexually abusing 10 boys. The scandal led to the ouster of Spanier and revered coach Joe Paterno and charges against Curley and Schultz, who are accused of perjury for their grand jury testimony and failing to properly report suspected child abuse. Spanier hasn't been charged.

The CNN report cites an email from Schultz to Curley on Feb. 26, 2001, 16 days after graduate assistant Mike McQueary told veteran coach Joe Paterno about the shower assault. Schultz suggests bringing the allegation to the attention of Sandusky, Sandusky's charity and the Department of Welfare, which investigates suspected child abuse, according to the report.

But the next night, Curley sent an email to Spanier, saying that after thinking about it more and talking to Paterno, he was "uncomfortable" with that plan and wanted to work with Sandusky before contacting authorities, the report said.

If Sandusky is cooperative, Curley's email said, "we would work with him. .... If not, we do not have a choice and will inform the two groups," according to the report.

Spanier wrote back and agreed with that approach, calling it "humane and a reasonable way to proceed," according to the report. But he also worried about the consequences.







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CriticalReader wrote:
Arrogance of educational institution. An emerging phenomenon in American society is the extent to which educational institutions believe they are above the law. Why is anyone surprised that Penn State administrators considered Sandusky's victims of no importance or consequence? That they believed it was in any way OK to skirt the clear requirements of the law. Requirements they were clearly aware of. These are the same people who've made millions, if not billions, off the backs of young people who sacrifice they're health and probably any chance at a real Penn St, education to fund the merriment of saturday football and wealthy alumni parties. And we keep on saying this system is OK. Those kids never had a chance once it was up to college administrators to protect them.
on June 30,2012 | 09:17AM
koaangel wrote:
The moral integrity of Penn State was severely compromised by a leader who lacked the courage to do what the law required. Again political expediency trumped what was the right thing to do. Our elected officials should learn from this experience whenever they consider choosing political expediency over ethical conduct.
on June 30,2012 | 10:09AM
kainalu wrote:
Great posts CriticalReader and koaangel. I concur.
on June 30,2012 | 11:19AM
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