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Drought-fueled fires destroy homes across Oklahoma

By Associated Press

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 02:25 a.m. HST, Aug 05, 2012


LUTHER, Okla. >> While residents of one Oklahoma town sifted through their charred belongings  to salvage what they could after a roaring wildfire that may have been deliberately set, residents in several other towns were being ordered to evacuate their homes.

The fire near Luther, about 25 miles northeast of Oklahoma City, destroyed nearly five dozen homes and other buildings before firefighters were able to gain some measure of control Saturday. The Luther fire was one of at least 10 burning Saturday in Oklahoma, where a severe drought has parched the landscape.

The fires include a large one in Creek County, in northeastern Oklahoma, that officials said had claimed about 78 square miles, and another about 35 miles to the west in Payne County. Emergency management officials ordered residents of Mannford, in Creek County; Glencoe, in Payne County; Drumright, in Lincoln County; Oak Grove, in Pawnee County; and Quinton, in Pittsburg County, to leave their homes, according to Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain.

Cain said no serious injuries had been reported.

A fire near the Tom Steed Reservoir in Kiowa County was also causing water delivery problems to Altus, in neighboring Jackson County, Cain said.

Authorities suspect the fire near Luther may have been intentionally set, while the cause of the others was undetermined. The Oklahoma County sheriff's department said it was looking for someone in a black pickup truck who was seen throwing newspapers out a window after setting them ablaze.

The summer in Oklahoma is shaping up to be much like last year's, with little rainfall, low humidity and temperatures exceeding 110 degrees in many locations. The Oklahoma Forestry Commission said that means it also could be another bad year for wildfires. "I think it's going to be right up there, (as among the worst) in memories, at least," said Michelle Finch-Walker, an agency spokeswoman.







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HD36 wrote:
64 heat records were set in Oklahoma in the month of July 2012. We had X class solar flares off the charts when we were in a solar minimum. Now that we are in a solar maximum, with the peak coming in December, and the earth's magnetic field at the weakest its been in over 2000 years, and with the earth's oceans creating 60% of the C02 because of the termperature change of the ocean floor due to friction between the crust and the mantle; due to entering the galactic plane of the milkey way galaxy, which increases the gravitational pull on our entire solar system, which reaches a peak on December 21, 2012, at which time we will have a geographical pole shift whereby continents will move hundreds of miles within hours. There are tropical forests frozen in the Antarica, and entire cities under hundres of feet of water off Japan and elswhere, proving that the continents shifted in a matter of hours, not millions of years as most were taught.
on August 5,2012 | 01:02AM
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