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Tuesday, July 29, 2014         

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DOT: More flights arriving on time and with luggage

By Scott Mayerowitz

AP Airlines Writer

POSTED:


NEW YORK >> U.S. airlines are more punctual and less likely to lose your bag than at any time in more than two decades.

Travelers still have to put up with packed planes, rising fees and unpredictable security lines, but they are late to fewer business meetings and are not missing as many chances to tuck their kids into bed.

Nearly 84 percent of domestic flights arrived within 15 minutes of their scheduled time in the first half of the year — the best performance since the government started keeping track in 1988.

The improvement over the first six months of 2011, when 77 percent of flights were on time, is mostly a result of good weather and fewer planes in the sky because of the weak economy.

Airlines are also doing a better job of handling bags. Fewer than three suitcases per 1,000 passengers were reported lost, damaged or delayed from January through June, a record low.

The two areas of improvement are related: When flights are late, bags often miss their connection.

If the current pace continues, the airlines will beat their best full-year performance, recorded in 1991, when nearly 83 percent of flights arrived on time. The worst full year was 2000, when just 73 percent of flights arrived on time, according to an Associated Press analysis of Bureau of Transportation Statistics data.

The worst year for baggage handling was 1989, when nearly eight suitcases per 1,000 passengers were reported late, lost or damaged.

There are still problems. About one out of every six flights is late — and that’s after airlines have adjusted schedules to account for congestion, said airline consultant Michael Boyd.

“That’s an indictment, not a record,” he said.

When flights are on time, it isn’t just good for passengers — it also helps the airlines’ bottom lines. The industry says it costs an average of $75 a minute to operate a plane. Last year, domestic delays cost airlines an estimated $5.2 billion. U.S. airlines made a combined $577 million in profit last year.

In the first six months of this year, nature has been kind to airlines. There have been 10 percent fewer thunderstorms than usual, according to a decade of data analyzed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aviation Weather Center.

There has also been less snow. New York has had about 3 inches this year, compared with a 10-year average of 20 inches. Chicago, which averages 27 inches of snow from January through June, has had just 18. And Minneapolis has had 12 inches, one-third the normal snowfall at this point in the year.

The recession led fewer people to fly and prompted airlines to ground planes, clearing up airspace. In 2007, 14.8 million airplanes took off and landed at the nation’s 35 largest airports, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Last year, the number was down 10 percent to 13.3 million.

The airlines also are taking steps to improve their on-time performance. They include:

— Better technology. Airlines are flying newer planes with fewer maintenance problems. New tools track the boarding of passengers and loading of baggage onto individual flights. If either falls behind schedule, extra workers are deployed to ensure an on-time departure.

— More realistic schedules. Flight times have been extended on some trips to account for air traffic delays. For instance, Delta Air Lines adds up to 16 minutes for Atlanta-to-New York flights during peak hours. Boyd and other critics say padding schedules may improve on-time statistics, but it shouldn’t be confused with better service.

— Timely delivery of food and fuel. Airlines have revised contracts with suppliers to include incentives for on-time deliveries and penalties for late ones.

— Improved boarding procedures. The order passengers get on a plane has been streamlined, and larger overhead bins have been installed.

New government rules also deter delays. The Department of Transportation now requires airlines to display the on-time performance of each flight on their websites.

There are also stiff penalties for long delays. For instance, if a plane is sitting on the tarmac for more than three hours, the airline can be fined up to $27,500 per passenger — or about $4 million for a typical jet. To avoid those fines, airlines created new software. As delays persist, special alerts flash for the local airport manager and at headquarters.

Since Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood took office in 2008, the department has nearly tripled the number of annual enforcement actions taken against airlines — from 20 to 59 last year. Fines have jumped from $1.2 million to $6.1 million.

“We sent a very loud message to the airlines that they need to treat people with respect,” LaHood said. “People pay a lot of money to get on an airplane and they expect to have to on-time service.”







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E_Ogawa wrote:
The real reason for the improvement in the lost luggage category has been fees tied to checked baggage, prompting more passengers to carry-on their bags. This lightens the load of the automatic bag sorters enabling them to operate more efficiently and effectively. It just stands to reason that the less bags in the belly of the plane, the less lost luggage events you'll have. As for on-time performance, if you were to factor out the weather, my guess is that you will still find many mechanical-related delays, particularly with Delta and United. These two carriers have become so large, their networks so complex, that managing such delays tax the capacity of local staff and create heavy burdens on engineers and other ground personnel to efficiently address problems timely. And I'm speaking from experience. On a recent trip to Hawai'i, I was stranded overnight in both directions owing to mechanical troubles with the aircraft. Leaving Honolulu, the passengers were moved to another aircraft, which was also delayed arriving. Then when we were ready to leave, United realized they didn't move the galley equipment from the original aircraft, which resulted in an additional 40 minutes on top of the 2 hours and 20 minutes that the flight was already delayed. Because I missed my connection on the coast, I had to get a hotel room on my own, and now the airline is giving me sh*t as I try to obtain compensation for the hotel expense (they had run out of rooms in their own inventory).
on August 9,2012 | 10:11AM
Publicbraddah wrote:
Arriving on time and with your luggage is a good thing.
on August 9,2012 | 10:23AM
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