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China sets air defense zone over East China Sea

By Associated Press

POSTED:



BEIJING >> The Chinese Defense Ministry on Saturday issued a map of an East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone that includes a chain of disputed islands also claimed by Japan, triggering a protest from Tokyo.

Beijing also issued a set of rules for the zone, saying all aircraft must notify Chinese authorities and are subject to emergency military measures if they do not identify themselves or obey orders from Beijing. It said it would "identify, monitor, control and react" to any air threats or unidentified flying objects coming from the sea.

The rules went into effect Saturday.

In Tokyo, Junichi Ihara, head of the Foreign Ministry's Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau, protested by phone to China's acting ambassador to Japan, Han Zhiqiang, saying the zone is "totally unacceptable," according to a ministry statement.

Ihara also criticized China for "one-sidedly" setting up the zone and escalating bilateral tensions over the islands.

Both Beijing and Tokyo claim the islets, known as the Senkakus in Japan and the Diaoyu in Chinese. Protests erupted throughout China last year to denounce the Japanese government's purchase of the islands from private ownership.

A rising economic and military power, China has become more assertive over its maritime claims. It has been in disputes with several neighboring countries over islands in the East and South China seas.

"China is playing a dangerous game here," said Narushige Michishita, director of the security and international studies program at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo. "It is certainly an escalatory action and might prolong and exacerbate the ongoing tension."

China said the zone is in line with the practice of other nations that have similar zones to protect their coasts. The new zone overlaps with Japan's existing zone, which also includes the disputed islands.

"This is a necessary measure taken by China in exercising its self-defense right," Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun was quoted as saying on the ministry's website. "It is not directed against any specific country or target. It does not affect the freedom of over-flight in the related airspace."

South Korea and Taiwan also claim the barren, uninhabited islands in the East China Sea.

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Online:

Chinese Defense Ministry Q&A: http://eng.mod.gov.cn/DefenseNews/2013-11/23/content--4476150.htm







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HD36 wrote:
The ultimate factor in determining this dispute is where each countrie's monetary and fiscal policy takes them. China has just announced that it is not in their interest to expand their balance sheet of foreign reserves beyond 3.66 trillion US dollars. In other words, they won't be buying anymore US Treasury Bonds. This is a step to let the Yuan float and will cause their currency to appreciate in value to the benefit of there citizens and country. Meanwhile Japan, through Abenomics is doubling its money supply to devalue the Yen. It's working. While wages in Japan have stagnated, the inflation rate has gone up, they've had their biggest trade deficit in years, and the purchasing power of Japan has decreased around 30% against the dollar. Japan already has the highest debt to GDP in the industrialized world while China is the largest creditor nation.
on November 23,2013 | 06:05AM
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