Quantcast
  

Saturday, April 19, 2014         

 Print   Email   Comment | View 2 Comments   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

Huawei reveals 'fastest smartphone in the world'

By Peter Svensson

AP Technology Writer

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 04:55 a.m. HST, Feb 25, 2013


BARCELONA, Spain » Huawei, a Chinese company that recently became the world's third-largest maker of smartphones, calls its new flagship product "the fastest smartphone in the world" and wants to use it to expand global awareness of its brand.

Parts of the presentation of the phone at a press conference Sunday in Barcelona, Spain, suggest that the company has some way to go in polishing its pitch for a global audience.

Richard Yu, head of Huawei's consumer business group said the new phone can be programmed to display more than 100 different "themes," or looks. This is important because "ladies like flowers, colorful things," Yu said.

Yu also said Huawei is learning from Apple how to make Google's Android software easier to use, a lawsuit-friendly utterance considering that Apple is on a global campaign to sue makers of Android phones for copying from the iPhone.

The new phone, the Ascend P2, will have a 4.7 inch screen. Yu said it will be available in the April to June time frame for about $525 without a contract. It's the "fastest" because it supports faster download speeds than other phones. However, today's wireless networks aren't equipped to supply those speeds.

Huawei Technologies Ltd. was the world's third largest seller of smartphones, after Samsung and Apple, in the fourth quarter of last year, according to research firm IDC. That's despite selling very few phones in the U.S., where the big phone companies mostly ignore it. It has a much better position in Europe, where cellphone companies have embraced its network equipment, and France's Orange is committed to selling the phone.

In the U.S., a congressional panel recommended in October that phone carriers avoid doing business with Huawei or its smaller Chinese rival, ZTE Corp., for fear that its network equipment could contain "back doors" that enable access to communications from outside. The Chinese government rejected the report as false and an effort to block Chinese companies from the U.S. market.

Meanwhile, a report by a private U.S. cybersecurity firm concluded recently that a special unit of China's military is responsible for sustained cyberespionage against U.S. companies and government agencies. China has denied involvement in the attacks in which massive amounts of data and corporate trade secrets, likely worth hundreds of millions of dollars, were stolen.

"It has not been an easy journey for us," Huawei's global brand director, Amy Lou, said Sunday of the company's quest to become globally recognized and trusted. She called the company "a great consumer brand in the making."

The world's largest cellphone trade show, Mobile World Congress, opens today in Barcelona.







 Print   Email   Comment | View 2 Comments   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

COMMENTS
(2)
You must be subscribed to participate in discussions
By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. Because only subscribers are allowed to comment, we have your personal information and are able to contact you. If your comments are inappropriate, you may receive a warning, and if you persist with such comments you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, email commentfeedback@staradvertiser.com.
Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.
nodaddynotthebelt wrote:
I just don't trust the Chinese government. They manufacture much of the hardware for our equipment such as computers and cell phones. By virtue of their manufacturing of the parts that go into our equipment they know the inner workings of our computers and even our nuclear reactors. They could easily plant programs in these parts that can wreak havoc on our power grids and even our internet. I can only imagine how much of their parts are in our military equipment.
on February 25,2013 | 09:55AM
cunfuzd4 wrote:
What's the sense of buying the "fastest" smart phone when current networks can't even provide anywhere near the phone's download capability? By the time the carriers bring their networks up to where they can provide speeds even close to what this phone can download, the other manufacturers will have phones to match which will be superior in quality and in all other aspects of smart phone performance.
on February 25,2013 | 04:06PM
IN OTHER NEWS
Breaking News