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Honolulu traffic congestion among the worst

By Erika Engle

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 09:20 a.m. HST, Jan 08, 2013


Honolulu is the fourth-most traffic-congested city in North America, according to the third congestion index by navigation device-maker TomTom.

The index compares travel times during congested periods, to times of day when traffic is flowing freely.

Traffic is worst in Los Angeles, Calif., and Vancouver, Canada, each with a 34 percent congestion level; San Francisco was ranked third at 33 percent; Honolulu was No. 4, at 31 percent, and Seattle was No. 5, at 27 percent.

The index measured traffic congestion in 57 metropolitan areas between July and September of 2012, based on real travel time captured by in-vehicle TomTom devices.

The full index is posted online www.tomtom.com/congestionindex .







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OldDiver wrote:
Another dagger in the heart of the anti-rail half truthers.
on January 8,2013 | 05:18AM
RichardCory wrote:
Oh, boy, here we go.
on January 8,2013 | 05:24AM
what wrote:
Of course traffic is bad, Honolulu and the DOT have done absolutely nothing to upgrade the highway infrastructure for TWO DECADES. They should have planned some flyovers, double decking, extending H-3 over Ford Island to Kapolei. But what do we have? NOTHING! Duh, of course traffic is going to get worse. The train is not going to do anything, since the people have show that they prefer the convenience and efficiency of cars. Cars are actually more efficient than the train since they only go where you want to go, and don't waste energy transporting empty cars at off peak times going where people don't want to go.
on January 8,2013 | 11:35AM
kalaoa wrote:
"double decking" "over Ford Island"????? Honolulu seems to not want elevated mass transit. Maybe underground roads and trains? Have fun digging in the lava and water.
on January 8,2013 | 04:36PM
kiragirl wrote:
Just the opposite! Everyday, stress and frustration driving in traffic and for years and years and guess what? Cannot complain because rail suppose to bring traffic relief. So enjoy it! This article made my day!
on January 8,2013 | 05:28AM
Wazdat wrote:
I could not agree more. All you pro-railers enjoy your TRAFFIC FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.
on January 8,2013 | 06:30AM
Rapanui00 wrote:
Well put - only a idiot would believe that a antiquated train system with low carrying capacity could relieve our traffic woes. Too much development and too many people - its so simple to see unless you have blinders on...
on January 8,2013 | 07:37AM
iansuen wrote:
You kidding me? The only way to solve the traffic congestion problem is to rip up Honolulu and start building from scratch all over again. Force people to live high density housing and make the mass-transit system extensive. If the rail as-is already makes some peoples blood boil imagine how much "worse" it could be...
on January 8,2013 | 09:34AM
kainalu wrote:
Part of a 4-decades long "master-plan" to isolate Hawaii's poor and working-class out on the Ewa Plain and in Central Oahu. Cracker-jack box-like track-homes stuffed into zero-lots like sardines in a can, with no vision on how to move these people eastward to their jobs, schools, or otherwise, other than a single-road that's never enough no matter how many times you try to widen it. Mahalo, rich developers and those state officials in your pocket.
on January 8,2013 | 07:40AM
MakaniKai wrote:
Mahalo kainalu ~ You just "hit the nail" on the head! Have a beautiful Tuesday. Aloha.
on January 8,2013 | 08:02AM
Kuniarr wrote:
Anyone who thinks that the traffic jams that occur on the H1 can not be eliminated or relieved need to only lo remember that similar - if not identical - traffic jams as the H1 has been eliminated or relieved on a similar highway in Portland, Oregon - the H26.
on January 8,2013 | 09:00AM
Anonymous wrote:
Kainalu, I remember when Kapolei was envisioned as O'ahu's "Second City". That's what it was sold to us as, promoting more jobs out Leeward way. Well, it got built, and guess what? Most of the people who live in Kapolei STILL gotta commute to downtown Honolulu with virtually NO improvement in transportation infrastructure. But the developers got what they wanted and the politicians got cash in their pockets. Only in Hawai'i. But please, do continue voting Democrat.
on January 8,2013 | 09:01AM
al_kiqaeda wrote:
Great point Anonymous. Rail was never -- NEVER -- about traffic reduction. It was and is about more development. I pity folks out west. It's about to get worse from here on out. First with the rail construction and then when the development.

Take a look at what happened in Hawaii Kai after they widened the road...more development.


on January 8,2013 | 12:35PM
Wazdat wrote:
Kainalu you said it brah
on January 8,2013 | 09:47AM
jrboi96786 wrote:
so the solution is to add more buses in the traffic?
on January 8,2013 | 10:26AM
al_kiqaeda wrote:
Add more buses to get cars off the road. I would love to leave my car at home IF ONLY there were more buses. I don't care if they get stuck in traffic because I'm not driving. I just hate WAITING for a bus at the stop.
on January 8,2013 | 12:37PM
localguy wrote:
Dont' blame OldDiver for his posts. Grabby Boy and HART tell him what to post. They still think rail will eliminate island wide traffic problems, end unemployment, bring us perfect roads, end ED for men, yada, yada, yada.
on January 8,2013 | 06:30AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
OldDiver wrote: "Another dagger in the heart of the anti-rail half truthers."

Dude, you got your train. Why so cranky? Did you just find out that it won't really reduce traffic, run on solar and wind, create thousands of jobs, or have adequate comfortable seating.

Also, talking about stabbing people you don't agree with a dagger, in their heart, isn't appropriate. The poster who you are copying always referred to the project itself, not actually individuals.
on January 8,2013 | 06:48AM
HAJAA1 wrote:
Awww....someone all habut because they live windward and have to pay for it. LOL!!
on January 8,2013 | 08:15AM
hybrid1 wrote:
Table 3-12, City Alternative Analysis:...Screenline: Kalauao Stream Koko Head bound: H-1 Highway capacity: 9,500 vehicles per hour (vph)............................... H-1 Observed Traffic volume = 10,960 vph :........................... Vehicle overload = 10,960 minus 9,500 = 1,460 vph...................................... H-1 Forecast volume with rail operating Kapolei to Ala Moana Center: = 17,209 vph................H-1 Vehicle Over load = 17,209 minus 9,500 = 7,709 vph................................ Conclusion: With rail operating from Kapolei to Ala Moana Center, H-1 traffic overload at H-1/H-2 merge in year 2030 = 7,709 vph overload divided by 9,500 vph capacity = 811 percent vph above highway H-1 capacity .......................................................... .With 64 seats, the two-car trains supposedly have room for 254 standing passengers.............But that’s at “crush capacity,” which is far more crowded than Americans are willing to accept....................... Assuming the city increases the seating to 76 seats, actual loads are likely to be limited to a total of about 150 to 200 people per train................... At a maximum of 20 trains an hour in each direction, the line will be able to move about 3,000 to 4,000 people per hour inbound in the morning and a similar number outbound in the afternoon.......................... By comparison, a highway lane can easily move 150 express or BRT buses per hour (a single lane can move 2,000 vehicles per hour), and at 100 seats per BRT bus that represents 15,000 people per hour, none of them having to stand.
on January 8,2013 | 07:19AM
OldDiver wrote:
I like your 600 buses an hour better.
on January 8,2013 | 07:52AM
Kuniarr wrote:
The dagger is not on the anti-rail but on the proponents of Rail.

For it is ridiculous to even think that people in this island still do know that across the Pacific Ocean, in Portland, Oregon, a highway similar to H1 - H26 - has practically eliminated the kind of stop and go traffic jams occurring on the H1.
on January 8,2013 | 08:57AM
loquaciousone wrote:
How can this be? Once the 1.55 billion dollars was appropriated traffic disappeared immediately. ....there is no traffic....there is not traffic....there is no traffic....
on January 8,2013 | 05:40AM
OldDiver wrote:
Another half truth.
on January 8,2013 | 06:24AM
loquaciousone wrote:
BUT you promised!
on January 8,2013 | 06:35AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Nice one my friend.
on January 8,2013 | 09:28AM
Pukele wrote:
Someday commuters will read the Parsons rail studies that were paid for with their tax dollars. When they do read these studies, they will see that rail will not help traffic along our crowded East West corridor. When rail is finished, Parsons tells us the traffic will go from bad to worse. Travel time will get longer. The commuters have been lied to by many people. The media and the city council have failed to read these reports and react.
on January 8,2013 | 05:53AM
OldDiver wrote:
Half truth. The study did not conclude this.
on January 8,2013 | 06:23AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
Yes it did. Traffic will be worse in the future after the train is built. It won't ever make traffic any better than it is today. The City used our own taxes to run ads claiming that rail would alleviate current traffic woes.
on January 8,2013 | 06:57AM
OldDiver wrote:
Kalaheo1, your half turths and out right falsehoods were defeated in November.
on January 8,2013 | 07:51AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
OldDiver wrote: "Kalaheo1, your half turths and out right falsehoods were defeated in November."

No. PB Americas, D R Horton and other big developers won. John White and the PRP slime machine won.

Building the 5.5 billion dollar train will never make traffic any better than it is today. The City lied when it used our own tax money to launch a media blitz claiming it would.

The truth hasn't changed.
on January 8,2013 | 09:20AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Truths omg
on January 8,2013 | 09:30AM
Kuniarr wrote:
Elections have nothing to do with Technology. 21st Century Technology has already found a solution to traffic jams. This island needs to get out of 1999 and into the 21st Century and follow exactly what other States in the mainland have been doing to eliminate or reduce stop and go traffic jams/
on January 8,2013 | 12:32PM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
lol u must be a TheBus Driver. Why do u not write long paragraphs? No forget to watch the roads otherwise u going run over your passengers.
on January 8,2013 | 09:29AM
Kuniarr wrote:
Bottom line is that all anyone who thinks that the stop and go traffic jams on the H1 can not be eliminated or relieved merely have to look over 5,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean to H26 in Portland, Oregon which had the very same malady of stop and go traffic congestion during heavy traffic but have now been relieved or even practically eliminated by making H26 a Smart highway.

The leaders of this island are 11 years behind the times and still stuck in the year 1999.
on January 8,2013 | 12:28PM
Anonymous wrote:
What, the Media will bias it's reporting in order to advance it's own agenda? Say it isn't so!
on January 8,2013 | 09:07AM
Allenk wrote:
San Francisco has had BART for years and they still have the third worst traffic ahead of us? What does this say? Rail provides an alternative transportation, but it won't eliminate as many cars as people think.
on January 8,2013 | 09:09AM
toomuchpilikia wrote:
Let's build the rail today...we will pay for it tomorrow! "You have to vote for the Bill first before you can find out what's in it". This is an island with over a million occupants....Great weather, Democratically controled to the max! Come one, come all, Hawaii will take care of all your needs!
on January 8,2013 | 05:53AM
BO0o07 wrote:
So true even though you meant it (?) in jest.
on January 8,2013 | 06:33AM
sailfish1 wrote:
Put blame where it belongs - All the stupid people who just have to drive all alone in their cars during the busiest times of the day. Take the buses, vanpool, and carpool and we would not have such congestion. Don't work/live too far from the home/workplace. Tell your kids to take the bus to school instead of driving them to school or letting them drive to school. Adjust work schedules. There are a multitude of things you can do to make the commute better. But NO! You all think the RAIL is the solution! Well, we won't have RAIL for several more years and it is not expected to make traffic and better.
on January 8,2013 | 06:01AM
Anonymous wrote:
Agreed. All of those drivers who can't find even one rider, to hit the zipper lane with, are going to ride with 90 strangers? If everyone on the Westside has this problem, how come no one can find anyone else to ride? I would be very hesitant to leave a car 10 hours a day in an open lot in the hotbed of car thefts myself.
on January 8,2013 | 06:26AM
Wazdat wrote:
Good Point, but COMMON SENSE id not found on this island
on January 8,2013 | 06:31AM
Anonymous wrote:
Why bother will all of that pilikia? Mo' bettah go on WELFARE! No need hassle with the traffic everyday. Instead, do whatevah you like all day and make mo' keiki fo' make mo' WELFARE. Das da life! You lolos who battle traffic everyday still nevah figgah it out!
on January 8,2013 | 09:11AM
false wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on January 8,2013 | 06:18AM
Allenk wrote:
Maybe we should offer quarterly rebates for those that leave their cars at home and take alternative means of transportation. Problem is where is the money going to come from?
on January 8,2013 | 09:12AM
Bdpapa wrote:
Oh well! Gotta take the kid to preschool, shop for groceries and cruise. But, I think I will wait til after 8.
on January 8,2013 | 06:19AM
soundofreason wrote:
Went to Vegas this last November and I've seen the modifications they've made to their freeways over the past 10 years. Amazing. Honolulu.........nothing. THERE'S the problem.
on January 8,2013 | 06:21AM
soundofreason wrote:
Did I mention that they use double decker buses? TWICE the carrying capacity PER bus. Ours are........where?
on January 8,2013 | 06:23AM
OldDiver wrote:
They have tons of land to build freeways. We don't.
on January 8,2013 | 06:27AM
loquaciousone wrote:
Land is measured in acres. Weight for people who drink too much beer is measured in tons.
on January 8,2013 | 06:36AM
PCWarrior wrote:
Rail. You wanted it. You got it. And I'll be laughing as we watch all our billions go down the drain for absolutely nothing. No worries for me. Just moved to town. There is a sucker born every minute, and thousands of 'em live in Hawaii.
on January 8,2013 | 01:08PM
soundofreason wrote:
Houses were purchased by the city and demolished. They MADE room.
on January 8,2013 | 07:21PM
localguy wrote:
Would not fit on all our roads, too tall, too many obstructions.
on January 8,2013 | 06:31AM
soundofreason wrote:
Again, due to "thinking ahead" design.
on January 8,2013 | 07:21PM
Wazdat wrote:
YUP. DOT and ELECTED leaders are INCOMPETENT
on January 8,2013 | 06:32AM
JAFO wrote:
don't forget the voters that placed them there.
on January 8,2013 | 09:10AM
localguy wrote:
Remember back to the story in this paper how Los Angeles, formerly #1 in traffic congestion, had come up with computer apps to be installed at intersections. These apps monitored traffic and made on the spot adjustments to ensure the best flow. No one had to control them, they did the work by themselves, very efficient. Now go to the Nei were we still have 50s technology timer and weight sensor controlled traffic lights, cycling regardless of traffic. How many times have you been stuck at a stop light with no other cars in sight? See how backwards HDOT is? They just sit at the Dysfunctional Traffic Management Center and laugh at all of us stuck in traffic. Los Angeles offers the technology to any city for a very small fee, yet we do nothing. Heaven forbid we have to admit we had to get outside help to solve our traffic problems. We do not have people at HDOT who have a clue how to reduce traffic congestion. This is what they do, nothing.
on January 8,2013 | 06:28AM
MakaniKai wrote:
Geez and to think at one time in history we were ahead of the "continent" electricity in Iolani Palace 1887, White House 1891, traffic lights today "priceless"............Aloha.
on January 8,2013 | 08:10AM
al_kiqaeda wrote:
Ever sat at the intersection of 16th and Waialae? Red light for both streets, cars that have the green arrow can't make their left turn because of an obvious design flaw. Soooo we ALL just sit there, no one can move so we just sit there and stare angrily at the empty intersection. While we sit there we all wonder how many tens and tens of thousands of dollars that modification cost us?
on January 8,2013 | 12:47PM
Wazdat wrote:
YES, the DOT is a complete JOKE
on January 8,2013 | 03:16PM
Wazdat wrote:
DUH. There have been NO NEW ROADS or FREEWAYS built BUT they have built tens of thousands of new homes and are still building with NO NEW ROADS OR FREEWAYS PLANNED.

Its common sense, but I guess that does NOT WORK IN HAWAII.

They should have a bridge or freeway over pearl harbor and double decker nimitz, expand middle st., etc. etc. etc.....


on January 8,2013 | 06:29AM
COlohe1 wrote:
They must not have measured traffic in NYC.
on January 8,2013 | 06:32AM
HAJAA1 wrote:
No....it's because they have mass public transportation
on January 8,2013 | 08:16AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
"Honolulu traffic congestion among the worst"

Well, good thing our developer and construction overlords have successfully redirected billions of tax dollars into a train from D R Horton's Ho'opili to the upscale mall. Problem. Solved.
on January 8,2013 | 06:32AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
"The index compares travel times during congested periods, to times of day when traffic is flowing freely."

I gotta say, that's unlike any other description of traffic congestion that I've ever heard.

Honestly, that sounds like a rush hour problem and the sort that could be solved with staggered work hours, an "actual" second city instead of giant suburb, and by not using taxes to encourage and subsidize city and state workers to drive and park in the city.

Even HART demanded to be in the center of Honolulu with reserved parking instead of out in Kapolei. No train is ever going to fix that sort of thinking.
on January 8,2013 | 06:39AM
Wazdat wrote:
YUP, common sense if missing from our elected leaders.
on January 8,2013 | 06:50AM
sunnyhi wrote:
The real truth is we developed the West side and created new communities but FAILED at strengthening these communities for families to live, work, and play. This is the reason the traffic is bad from the west side. And, until we become smarter in our voices to demand answers other than rail, the traffic will never improve. Rail is an expensive and ugly band aid. Improving the public school system, expanding the UH-West campus, and giving breaks to businesses to move to the West side so families can stay in their community is the real and neglected problem.
on January 8,2013 | 06:44AM
kennie1933 wrote:
sunnyhi, thanks for commenting. I've been saying this all along. Whether rail, BRT, ferry, or whatever, they are NOT the solution to the traffic problem, just "band aids" as you stated. UH just returned to session yesterday. For all of us who live on the west side, how was traffic for the past three weeks? Almost non-existent, right? Except for minor slow downs at the H1-H2 merge (and even then, "slowing down" to 45), it was practically clear sailing into town. Then all of a sudden, yesterday was stop and go. Students going to UH is THE problem! The long term solution, as you also say, is to expand UHWO and make it as good or better than the Manoa campus to keep west side students on the west side. In the short term, perhaps UH can offer a shuttle system where students meet at park and rides in the west and catch shuttles to Manoa. These students can be issued a card or maybe program it into their IDs to scan each ride. Then, for every time the student uses the shuttle, s/he gets a little tuition discount as an incentive to ride the shuttle. The real problem is not being SOLVED by rail. It's like a heart patient who has a heart attack and gets a bypass or stint. It will work temporarily, but if the patient continues to eat a poor/fatty diet and does not exercise, the problem will reoccur.
on January 8,2013 | 07:31AM
sunnyhi wrote:
Kennie, finally someone on this thread who understands! How do we get the politicians to open their eyes to the real problem? The only time there is traffic is when school is in session. It's the big elephant in the room that nobody wants see because they are too busy trying to come up with short-term solutions for political gain. It takes me half the time to drive to work when school is out of session. We could create solutions short of miracles with the same funding as rail to improve the quality of education and work on the West side. I am not encouraged that our current politicians will address this because nobody wants to really work hard and fight for the West side residents. But I might get lucky and some politican may take me up on it and actually initiate a plan to address this need and start the process. But, by the time this problem is solved, it will have taken just as long as rail and the rail supporters will come back and say it was raile that reduced traffic all along. Auwe.
on January 8,2013 | 07:43AM
al_kiqaeda wrote:
Been posting this for years too. Right on!
on January 8,2013 | 12:49PM
kiragirl wrote:
I've been harking on this for awhile but the other contributor to traffic are teachers. They receive free parking whereas all other state employees must pay. If teachers had to pay for their parking, incentives could be given for those who car pool or teach in their neighborhood, which will reduce the number of cars on the freeways. The BoE have no guts implementing teachers pay for their parking because of the wrath of the teachers and HSTA. Oh, and the financial gain would be helpful to many programs in the DOE.
on January 8,2013 | 09:25AM
MakaniKai wrote:
sunnyhi...........Mahalo we have another WINNER! Aloha.
on January 8,2013 | 08:11AM
gth wrote:
Sunnyhi: You are so right. Also, add the infrastructure to the list of failed improvements.
on January 8,2013 | 11:23AM
onevoice82 wrote:
You are so correct and the state used the tobacco settlement money that Hawaii received to build the John Burns school of medicine right in prime Kakaako property which should be used for high rises. The school should have been built in Kapolei, and the snooty professors should be made to drive out to the west side to teach medicine! Too late........
on January 8,2013 | 11:37AM
ichiban wrote:
Let's see--I think Vancouver has the monorail, Seattle has a light rail system, San Francisco has BART, LA was built with cars in mind. Three out of the five worst traffic congested cities in North America have a rail system. This doesn't bode much for a rail system as a panacea for traffic congestion. And along comes Hawaii following their footstep, using taxpayers money on a project that will give us the least bang for the buck. Except for unions, lobbyists, and groups like PRP. Yep, government at work as usual.
on January 8,2013 | 06:52AM
Rapanui00 wrote:
well put - interesting that the leftist newspaper is now trying to block many of my posts...
on January 8,2013 | 07:39AM
Maneki_Neko wrote:
It is very sad that the Hawaii taxpayers will have to cough up billions and billions, most of which leaves the State, to build something that will not decrease traffic congestion. We were deceived from the beginning. The rail is a developers' dream, a taxpayer's night mare.
on January 8,2013 | 07:40AM
Rapanui00 wrote:
exactly!
on January 8,2013 | 07:48AM
OldDiver wrote:
Nonsense ichiban. With rail their traffic would be much worse. As the city has said before, while traffic will be worse after rail is built it will be much worse without it. In other words rail won't stop population growth, nothing will, but rail will give people an alternative to sitting in traffic.
on January 8,2013 | 07:58AM
ichiban wrote:
OldDiver-- I hope you meant "Without rail....". Show me where the city said "traffic will be worse after rail is built....".I'm not from Missouri, but OD, SHOW ME THE WHOLE CONTEXT of the city admitting publicly the rail system will not ease traffic congestion AFTER THE RAIL IS BUILT. And nobody mentioned population growth. The alternative will be riders of the rail standing in traffic.
on January 8,2013 | 08:57AM
Kuniarr wrote:
There is no excuse for Honolulu to continue to have traffic jams ... to continue sitting in traffic

H26 had the same stop and go traffic jams as the H1 but by making H26 smart, traffic jams on the H26 have practically vanished.
on January 8,2013 | 09:07AM
Allenk wrote:
OD said, "but rail will give people an alternative to sitting in traffic." All this time the primary argument from the pro-rail contingent has been that it will reduce traffic which is not the case. So the amount of time, effort and money spent on this project is for nothing.
on January 8,2013 | 09:22AM
PCWarrior wrote:
And all it'll cost is $10 billion and counting. What a deal for all of us.
on January 8,2013 | 01:47PM
Eagle156 wrote:
Just wait until they tear up our beautiful downtown Honolulu to build the stupid train. You aint seen nothing yet.!
on January 8,2013 | 09:19AM
jussayin wrote:
Ditto other posts about building new homes and high rises. We KNOW there is a traffic problem. And there are infrastructure problems too; check out your water/sewer bill which goes up each year to pay for upgrades. So WHY do 'we' keep building??? Typical government. The people suffer. Ugh.
on January 8,2013 | 08:09AM
kennie1933 wrote:
This bothers me, too! I live on the west side so I know first hand about all the problems there. I can't understand why we keep allowing developers to build build build with no regards to the effect of the added homes/people. Koa Ridge and Ho'opili were approved, and each development will be about 5000 homes to start (more alter, I guarantee.....think Mililani). And, both developments will also take prime farm land. To me, developers should also be held accountable for improving infrastructure BEFORE the first home is even built. Upgrade the sewer facilities and water lines. We always read about pipes bursting and sewers overflowing, and this is happening without the new homes so imagine WITH them! Help improve the schools, the streets, and, if this rail thing is going to happen, at least help pay for some of it or donate some land for park and ride areas. It seems like all developers want to do is build as many crackerbox tract homes (someone stated above) as possible to get the biggest profit. Yes, they create jobs, and yes, they provide more available housing for families, but what happens after the homes are built and how they negatively affect the communities do not seem to bother them. It's the government's problem and ultimately, us taxpayers' problem!
on January 8,2013 | 08:41AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Any Board of Water Supply employee will tell us that there is a limited supply of water on an isolated island such as Oahu, so try take it easy, eh. I know u guys not Donald Trump, yet we need to moderate our population. On the other hand, the brain drain is helping keep the population at an even keel because many Punahou graduates go and live in California's Silicon Valley lol. So all is well in Hawaii Nei. No waste wata eh!!
on January 8,2013 | 09:37AM
inverse wrote:
The study only CONFIRMS that rail plays NO part in addressing traffic problems as measured by this study. Traffic gridlocked LA, Vancouver and SF ALL have rail transit systems. How about actually showing an unbiased analysis of Oahu's traffic problems which will only confirm what Oahu residents already know and that it is the West Oahu to Honolulu (& back) school commuting crowd that creates weekday traffic gridlock and how solutions like addressing known Oahu road/highway chokepoints will improve commuting times for EVERYONE from the school commuter, work commuter and visitors travelling via rental car or private bus.
on January 8,2013 | 08:18AM
Kuniarr wrote:
It's been over 11 years since this island crossed the threshold of the 21st Century.

By this time, Traffic Congestion, should have been dramatically relieved.

By this time, the persistent and on-going stop and go traffic jams should have been relieved, or even eliminated by making the H1 Smart. One need only look at how the very same type of stop and go traffic jams that have been practically eliminated on a similar highway - H26 in Portland, Oregon.
on January 8,2013 | 08:51AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
It boils down to this: The State has jurisdiction over the Interstate Freeway system and The City went ahead and attempted to solve a State traffic congestion issue with the feeble attempt on the train, whereas the State is already going ahead with some improvements such as the afternoon Zipper Lane on the H-1 West, and the now completed four lane solution near the Ward Avenue area of the H-1 in both directions. Mufi, u being out of office proves that we never did like TheTrain.
on January 8,2013 | 09:25AM
Kuniarr wrote:
Rail does not in any manner solve or even bring relief to the persistent stop and go traffic jams that occurs on the H1.

Zipper lanes and the scheduled three Congestion Program projects of the State identified in the Final Financial Plan for Full Funding Agreement all do not in any manner bring relief to traffic jams and are actually aimed at making Public Transportation as well as car/van pool travel faster.

The State Department of Transportation is 11 years behind the times and until now have not realized nor recognized the fact that Traffic Jams on the H1 is easily relieved or even practically eliminated as what was done on H26 and many Interstate highways in the mainland.
on January 8,2013 | 09:59AM
Publicbraddah wrote:
Erika, I think this is very old news. Very old.
on January 8,2013 | 09:08AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Besides it is good to experience the California freeways right here in Hawaii. No need to go to the mainland lol.
on January 8,2013 | 09:18AM
E_Ogawa wrote:
Not sure what other's have written, but I wouldn't put too much weight on this report. It doesn't say anything about the number of users of the Tom.Tom navigation device, and my guess is that there's a disproportionate number of users in Honolulu versus other cities. I mean, how many of you know people in Honolulu who have this device? Furthermore, if the information is simply gathered from signals provided by the device to the satellites, you have to consider many "out-of-area" drivers given consideration in the other cities. You won't find that in Honolulu. Nevertheless, I would agree Honolulu traffic is very heavy, and likely does rank highly in the country. But the data used in this report has a couple of obvious flaws, so I'd say the #4 ranking is quite misguided.
on January 8,2013 | 09:11AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
I like Magellan myself, the one that created the Never Lost system for Hertz.
on January 8,2013 | 09:19AM
HonoluluHawaii wrote:
Rail will bring traffic relief to the pocketbooks of the few and the proud and i am not talking about the marines. My dad was in the construction industry, so i am virtually going against my dad when i say that the $2 billion can be spent in Hawaii rather than giving it to a near Third World Country such as Italy. Please take a look at some of the innovative means of traffic congestion solutions and some will open your eyes, instead of building a monolithic structure such as the rail that will benefit just the few. For example, even though i bank primarily with American Savings Bank, a subsidiary of Hawaiian Electric, i think it was not kosher of Constance Lau to promote TheTrain knowing that her company would benefit from the increased Electricity usage by the Rail. Secondly, we need to look at Kirk Caldwell's victory as a mediocre one, because he did not win like maybe 75% to 25% over Cayetano. So 45% of Oahu thinks that the Rail is a bad idea. Why not compromise and try to get a better solution rather than saying that oh we won The BCS Championship Game, so crown us lol. By the way, one of the ones i seen on You Tube was the modernization of North King Street from Middle Street to Downtown. Please see North King Street - a potential traffic solution.mov on You Tube and my comment on it this morning, which is the only comment that the video has. Anyways, so Hawaii is the fourth most congested highways system. Well what are we going to do about it? The solutions to that needed to have been done 20 years ago, not now into the future with DaTrain, which is the inappropriate solution which will not solve the congestion. What will solve it? Get Grandpas and Grandmas off the streets, and have Ohana take care of their parents instead of letting them roam the highways, like the 82 year old man who got run over just because he wanted some Papaya. Also, we have the poorest road conditions here, so that people cannot take advantage of the roads and driving safely. Another factor: i hear that one out of seven vehicles are not insured, which means the drivers of those vehicles say to themselves Ainokea. Enough OldDiver, or u like me talk some more??!!
on January 8,2013 | 09:14AM
iansuen wrote:
Could someone tell which page Honolulu is mentioned on the "TomTom North American Congestion Index Q2-2012" pdf report?
on January 8,2013 | 09:40AM
jrboi96786 wrote:
but apparently some people thinks that the solution to this problem is to squeeze more buses into traffic because people loves to take a bus because its much faster than regular vehicles and rail.
on January 8,2013 | 10:19AM
desertpup wrote:
I downloaded the 2012 congestion index from TomTom and I see Seattle at #4. In fact, Honolulu isn't even shown on the top 26 most congested cities. Am I missing something? Is there another 2012 traffic congestion index that I can't find that has the data discussed in the article?
on January 8,2013 | 10:39AM
iansuen wrote:
Exactly. This needs to be cleared up.
on January 8,2013 | 11:37AM
entrkn wrote:
Some cities in Asia and Europe have significantly reduced traffic congestion by comprehensively embracing motor scooters and motorcycles. They dedicate whole highway lanes to 2 wheel motor traffic. They create convenient dedicated city parking for motorcycles and motor scooters. They amend traffic laws to penalize drivers of cars and trucks who are involved in accidents with motorcycles and motor scooters with mandatory jail sentences, seizure of their property, and drivers license revocation. This may sound draconian and crazy but it works really well in the cities where they have made these changes.
on January 8,2013 | 11:03AM
loquaciousone wrote:
Unfortunately, in Hawaii we have another name for two wheelers -- organ donors.
on January 8,2013 | 12:22PM
Allenk wrote:
Whatever happened to more bike lanes? I think more people would use bikes if it wasn't near suicide to get out there. It is already hazardous to one's health to attempt to cross a street on foot.
on January 8,2013 | 03:45PM
environmental_lady wrote:
Finally, after a long list of comments bike lanes are mentioned here. Most trips are five miles or less, so why not install more bike lanes? It's the most cost effective way of reducing congestion. I bet Amsterdam, Holland, and Copenhagen, Denmark, have far less congestion thanks to all the bike riders encouraged by a network of bike paths and traffic laws favorable to cyclists. Their climate is far less conducive to bike riding with cold and rain and still masses of people ride bicycles. So why can't Honolulu inhabitants turn to bicycles as a solution for gridlock?
on January 8,2013 | 06:38PM
desertpup wrote:
Seriously, did anyone else actually download from the link and check the data? I might be missing something, here, but this article's source data does not reflect anything they say. Honolulu doesn't even make the list. Interestingly, the top city with increasing congestion last year was Seattle, and they just finished their rail project, right? Can someone find the data that corresponds to the article?
on January 8,2013 | 02:02PM
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