Quantcast

Monday, July 28, 2014         

 Print   Email   Comment | View 7 Comments   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

Colorado farmers arrested in fatal listeria outbreak in 2011

By Steven K. Paulson and Dan Elliott

Associated Press

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 01:26 a.m. HST, Sep 27, 2013


DENVER >> The owners of a Colorado cantaloupe farm were arrested Thursday on charges stemming from a 2011 listeria epidemic that killed 33 people in one of the nation's deadliest outbreaks of foodborne illness.

Federal prosecutors said brothers Eric and Ryan Jensen were arrested on misdemeanor charges of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. Each man faces six counts.

They pleaded not guilty in federal court and were released on unsecured bonds. Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2.

Prosecutors said the federal Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determined the Jensens didn't adequately clean the cantaloupe.

Criminal charges in food poisoning cases are rare, said attorney William Marler, who represents many of the listeria victims in civil cases against Jensen Farms. Only four other people have faced such charges in the past decade, he said.

The FDA has said the melons likely were contaminated in Jensen Farms' packing house. It concluded that dirty water on a floor, and old, hard-to-clean equipment probably were to blame.

The epidemic was the deadliest outbreak of foodborne illness in 25 years, and it delivered a serious blow to Colorado cantaloupe farmers.

A number of lawsuits were filed by people who were sickened or who had a family member die after the outbreak.

Eric Jensen, 37, and Ryan Jensen, 33, could face up to six years in prison and up to $1.5 million in fines each if convicted of all counts against them, prosecutors said.

The Jensens' farm in southeastern Colorado filed for bankruptcy after the outbreak.

After today's hearing, the men released a statement calling the outbreak a "terrible accident" and saying they were shocked and saddened by it. The statement said the charges do not imply they knew about the contamination, or that they should have known about it.

Jeff Dorschner, a spokesman for federal prosecutors, said the misdemeanor "was the best, most serious charge we could find."

Felony charges would have required prosecutors to show the contamination was intentional.

"The real significance of the case against the Jensens is they are being charged with misdemeanors, which do not require intent, just the fact that they shipped contaminated food using interstate commerce," Marler said.

Dorschner said prosecutors decided to pursue the case because so many people were affected.

"It was the magnitude of the number of people who were hospitalized and the number of people who died," he said. Prosecutors said people in 28 states ate the cantaloupe, and 147 people were hospitalized.

The illnesses quickly were linked to the Jensens' farm, with the FDA saying on Oct. 19, 2011, that the outbreak probably was caused by pools of water on the floor and old, hard-to-clean packing equipment there. The agency said contamination at the packing facility likely was to blame. Investigators found positive listeria samples on equipment and fruit there.

The FDA said Jensen Farms had recently purchased used equipment that was corroded and hard to clean. The agency said the way the cantaloupes were cooled after coming off the fields might also have contributed to listeria growth.

Asked why it took so long to file charges, Dorschner said officials needed time to develop the case.

The outbreak was a setback for farms in Colorado's revered Rocky Ford cantaloupe region, where hot, sunny days and cold nights produce fruit known for its distinct sweetness.

Jensen Farms was about 90 miles away from Rocky Ford, but the Jensens used the Rocky Ford name, and sales dropped across the region. Later, Rocky Ford farmers registered Rocky Ford Cantaloupe as a trademark, hired a full-time food safety manager and built a central packing operation where melons are washed and rinsed.

Tammie Palmer, whose husband, Charles, became ill after eating the cantaloupe, said she hopes the Jensens never return to farming.

The Palmers, represented by Marler, filed a lawsuit against Jensen Farms seeking $2 million. The suit was still pending when Charles Palmer died this year of cancer.

"I was hoping everything would be settled and I could do something with my husband, but that's not going to happen," she said.







 Print   Email   Comment | View 7 Comments   Most Popular   Save   Post   Retweet

COMMENTS
(7)
You must be subscribed to participate in discussions
By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. Because only subscribers are allowed to comment, we have your personal information and are able to contact you. If your comments are inappropriate, you may receive a warning, and if you persist with such comments you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, email commentfeedback@staradvertiser.com.
Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.
cojef wrote:
Many streams in the islands are infested with the listeria. Remembe a case several years ago about a freshman returning to a mainland college in the East of dying from listeria. The news article further articulated that he was on a Spring break and had returned home and swam in a local stream. SA may have the the news account in their archives.
on September 26,2013 | 03:11PM
LanaAloha wrote:
No one was criminally prosecuted in any other food outbreak cases where they weren't knowingly endangering consumers. If they are going to do it for one, they should do it for all. It seems unfair these people have been singled out despite the tragedy of it all.
on September 26,2013 | 04:25PM
nitpikker wrote:
maybe they should have suspected something when buying old, used equipment, and apparently dirty too.
on September 26,2013 | 05:54PM
RetiredWorking wrote:
IRT nitpikker, maybe they've had the equipment since new and neglected to clean it. Who knows?
on September 26,2013 | 07:05PM
kawika49 wrote:
How about. cleaning and washing your produce , prior to sale?
on September 26,2013 | 09:12PM
serious wrote:
How about cleaning it before you eat it??? Look how many times customers in a grocery store handle the fresh foods??? Ever use the remote in a motel before cleaning it???
on September 27,2013 | 05:36AM
Publicbraddah wrote:
Our deadly streams are infected with leptospirosis.
on September 27,2013 | 06:57AM
IN OTHER NEWS
Breaking News
Blogs
Political Radar
`My side’

Political Radar
‘He reminds me of me’

Bionic Reporter
Needing a new knee

Warrior Beat
Monday musings

Small Talk
Burning money

Political Radar
On policy

Warrior Beat
Apple fallout