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Avalanche sweeps down Everest, killing at least 12

By ASSOCIATED PRESS

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 01:39 p.m. HST, Apr 18, 2014


KATMANDU, Nepal » An avalanche swept down a climbing route on Mount Everest early Friday, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving four missing in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. Several more were injured.

The Sherpa guides had gone early in the morning to fix ropes for other climbers when the avalanche hit them at about 6:30 a.m., Nepal Tourism Ministry official Krishna Lamsal said from the base camp where he is monitoring rescue efforts.

An injured survivor told his relatives that the path up the mountain was unstable just before the avalanche. As soon as the avalanche hit, rescuers, guides and climbers rushed to help.

Four survivors were injured badly enough to require airlifting to a hospital in Katmandu. One arrived during the day, and three taken to the foothill town of Lukla could be evacuated Saturday. Others with less serious injuries were being treated at base camp.

Rescue workers pulled out 12 bodies from under mounds of snow and ice and were searching for the four missing guides, Lamsal said. Officials had earlier said three were missing.

The avalanche hit an area nicknamed the "popcorn field" for its bulging chucks of ice and is just below Camp 2, Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association said. Camp 2 sits at an elevation of  21,000 feet on the 29,035-foot mountain.

One injured guide, Dawa Tashi, lay in the intensive care unit at Grande Hospital in the capital late Friday after being evacuated from the mountain. Doctors said he suffered several broken ribs and would be in the hospital for a few days.

Tashi told his visiting relatives that the Sherpa guides woke up early and were on their way to fix ropes to the higher camps but were delayed because of the unsteady path. Suddenly the avalanche fell on the group and buried many of them, according to Tashi's sister-in-law Dawa Yanju.

Hundreds of climbers, guides and support crews are at Everest's base camp preparing to climb to the summit when weather conditions will be at their most favorable early next month. They have been setting up camps at higher altitudes, and guides have been fixing routes and ropes on the slopes above.

The Sherpa people are one of the main ethnic groups in Nepal's alpine region, and many make their living as climbing guides on Everest and other Himalayan peaks.

More than 4,000 climbers have summited Everest since 1953, when it was first conquered by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hundreds have died attempting to reach the peak.

The worst recorded disaster on Everest had been a snowstorm on May 11, 1996, that caused the deaths of eight climbers. Six Nepalese guides were killed in an avalanche in 1970.

Earlier this year, Nepal announced several steps to better manage the heavy flow of climbers and speed up rescue operations. The steps included the dispatch of officials and security personnel to the base camp at 17,380 feet, where they will stay throughout the spring climbing season that ends in May.







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soundofreason wrote:
Note that territory doesn't lay down and accept law suits from people who CHOSE to take inherent risks - unlike here.
on April 18,2014 | 07:55AM
AhiPoke wrote:
If not done already, it's only a matter of time before US attornies file suits in US courts against everyone connected to the climb. That would include companies who made the gear, airlines that took them to Nepal, etc. You only need to observe what happening with Malysian flight 370 to deduct that the paperwork is already being prepared.
on April 18,2014 | 12:54PM
steven_mark wrote:
I guess it's fun to be cynical here and take out your gripes against lawyers, but let's look at reality here. These were Sherpas, i.e., Nepalese citizens, who were killed, so airlines wouldn't be on the hook. Chances are, they were employees and maybe even co-owners of the tour company, so they were the ones liable. And any foreigner planning to climb Everest would have to sign a waiver precluding a lawsuit in case of death or dismemberment. This is just a sad situation for the families and friends of the deceased. Let's leave it at that and let these people bury them in dignity.
on April 18,2014 | 05:21PM
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