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Anglers cite development as detrimental to fisheries

By Audrey McAvoy / Associated Press

POSTED:



Hawaii fishermen asked policymakers Monday to address how runoff caused by land development harms reefs, fisheries and the ocean when they consider how to cope with the effects of climate change.

Ocean health can't be looked at in segments, Oahu fisherman Roy Mori­oka told a committee of the federal body responsible for managing fisheries around Hawaii and other parts of the western Pacific region.

Government officials need to take a comprehensive approach, Mori­oka told a Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council committee on ecosystem management in Hawaii.

"You need to pull it all together because not one thing is the issue, it's a collective thing that is the issue," Mori­oka said.

Carl Jellings of Wai­anae told the committee that fishermen are often told reefs are unhealthy because of overfishing. Fishermen like him are scapegoats, he said.

He argued that what happens on land is one cause of deteriorating reefs. But he says fishermen can't control what happens "up mauka."

"We fight every day so we can continue fishing. It's getting harder and harder because more things are happening in the environment that we're getting blamed for," Jellings said.

The fishermen spoke at the council's Regional Ecosystem Advisory Committee for Hawaii fisheries.

The council heard from scientists about how temperatures are rising globally while, locally, rainfall has been declining. They heard how open-ocean species such as tuna might adapt better as oceans warm because they can move around. Species like coral that stay in place might have a harder time adapting.

Committee members also heard about how rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere — as humans burn more fossil fuels — are making the ocean more acidic.

Brad Warren of the global nonprofit organization Sustainable Fisheries Partnership told the committee that ocean acidification affects how marine life and fisheries stocks grow, and that this introduces greater uncertainty for fishery managers.






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Grimbold wrote:
As soon as Anglers see one larger fish jumping at our area there is a dozen of them and spear divers beleaguring that area for a week, until nothing is left. Fish have no Chance to spawn . Development Plays a neglectable reason of the fishless oceans.
on June 18,2013 | 03:33AM
cojef wrote:
You kill the coral reefs by draining swamp water into ocean and the seaweed do not propagate, causing small species to seek elsewhere to breed, and large fishes will have to look other areas to seek prey. Pesticide drains into the shoreline waters killing all sea water plant life and the beat goes on. Overperiod of years even small crusteceans in the reefs disappear. Seen this happen in Kapaa back in the 30's when the plantation drained the swamp to plant sugar cane. The sugarcane yield did not meet expectations and after several years the fields were abandoned. Leaving the locals with barren reefs devoid of fishery.
on June 18,2013 | 10:30AM
leino wrote:
"Scapegoats" or denial ... What I see are lots of fish in Marine Life Conservation zones like Hanauma Bay and Pupukea. What works on other islands in the south Pacific where the ocean really is the source of daily subsistence are Kapu zones. Then "spill over" from these protected areas supplies the next generation all around the Island due to the currents. Big mama females make the most eggs. They need more protection. It is amazing to me that the DLNR has not created many more Marine Life Conservation Districts in Hawaii. Smart money would set aside 30% of our near shore waters and maybe have a rolling kapu that shifted every 20 years. It takes a long time for the reef life to come back to full capacity. North America used to have herds of buffalo ... not anymore!!
on June 18,2013 | 06:16AM
Manoa_Fisherman wrote:
Marine preserves is not management of a resource, it is a total ban on any fishing activity. Preserves only benefit tour operators who have dive boats that take tourist out to their private/public aquarium. 20 year bans is essentially a lifetime ban for most fishermen and does nothing to enhance the fishery or preserve the recreational fishery. In an island state, many families enjoy the times spent fishing as a low cost alternative to expensive outings to the movies or water parks. Not everyone has money to burn on trips to the mainland. Also, fishermen and hunters pay a hefty tax burden with a 10% federal excise tax on outdoor equipment to fund fisheries and game enhancement. Just because the State of Hawaii is a poor manager of our resources is no reason to impose even more fees and taxes on the people of Hawaii.
on June 18,2013 | 10:14AM
pigo wrote:
I guess you haven't been to Hanauma Bay lately ever since they stopped feeding the fish it really sucks!! Hanauma Bay is a toilet now!! According to studies done by scientists the "spillover effect is something like 1 tenth of 1 percent!! Certain species of fish tend to congregate in certain areas and some pass through so setting aside MPAs or MLCDs makes no sense at all because it creates an imbalance of the ecosystem. You sound like a member of the Nature Conservancy, Kahea or one of those other clowns who want to ruin Hawaii!!
on June 18,2013 | 10:16PM
popaa wrote:
What is the explanation for "dirty" seaweed in one location and clean ones in another? For instance, popoklo, which should be green, is brown and covered with sediment in one area, but bright green in another.
on June 18,2013 | 08:29AM
FISHMAN20 wrote:
Yes, there are many activities that are affecting the health of the reef and the fish populations. It does no good to use that as an excuse to do nothing. Hawaii is famous for doing very little to protect its fisheries. Precious little in the way of fisheries management. Hardly any rules on minimum sizes, bag limits, fishing seasons, and we don't even have a fishing license for crying out loud. People say "why make more laws since we do not enforce them anyway". Another poor excuse for doing nothing. If there were license fees maybe we could afford to support enforcement. It is legal to take as many opihi as you want, spearfish at night with SCUBA and kill as many fish as you can carry away, lay out gill nets all the way across bays, and on and on. The Legislature refuses to let enforcement officials look into coolers for illegal fish. They also refuse to give the Department of Aquatic Resources the ability of Adaptive Management. If there is an obvious problem with a specific species or fishing method they cannot change the rules, they are made to go through an arcane legal process that literally can a decade to pass, and at best close the barn door way after the horse is gone. We are the only State in the country with such a lame and ineffective "management" system. So fine, talk about ocean acidification, and CO2 in the air, and other academic excuses, but don't pretend they are even remotely significant compared to the long list of obvious solutions staring you right in the face.
on June 18,2013 | 08:59AM
FISHMAN20 wrote:
Yes, there are many activities that are affecting the health of the reef and the fish populations. It does no good to use that as an excuse to do nothing. Hawaii is famous for doing very little to protect its fisheries. Precious little in the way of fisheries management. Hardly any rules on minimum sizes, bag limits, fishing seasons, and we don't even have a fishing license for crying out loud. People say "why make more laws since we do not enforce them anyway". Another poor excuse for doing nothing. If there were license fees maybe we could afford to support enforcement. It is legal to take as many opihi as you want, spearfish at night with SCUBA and kill as many fish as you can carry away, lay out gill nets all the way across bays, and on and on. The Legislature refuses to let enforcement officials look into coolers for illegal fish. They also refuse to give the Department of Aquatic Resources the ability of Adaptive Management. If there is an obvious problem with a specific species or fishing method they cannot change the rules, they are made to go through an arcane legal process that literally can a decade to pass, and at best close the barn door way after the horse is gone. We are the only State in the country with such a lame and ineffective "management" system. So fine, talk about ocean acidification, and CO2 in the air, and other academic excuses, but don't pretend they are even remotely significant compared to the long list of obvious solutions staring you right in the face.
on June 18,2013 | 09:18AM
Fishermen wrote:
Amazing, when people point at fishermen, all they can think about is how cheap they can get food and goods here (dredge a few harbors), how fast they can get to where they are going (pave a few more miles), how convenient it will be to park their car to buy their coffee (erase a few more acres), how cool they will be when they get there (burn a few more gallons), how quickly they can get their waste out of sight and smelling range (dump a few more gallons out in the ocean or bury a few more cubic yards), all the comforts of life. Yet no one actually realizes what effect that has on the immediate ecosystem that surrounds us. What happens on land affects what happens in the ocean. The Hawaiian people knew that and it worked exactly that way for thousands of years before they arrived. We changed it severely in less than 100 years.
on June 18,2013 | 09:52AM
Hapa_Haole_Boy wrote:
I wish that more was done to conserve sport fish in the early/mid 1900s, because nowadays Oahu (and Maui from what I've heard) is so fished out. I wish people practiced/would practice catch and release more often. And do things to help papio, ulua, lai, oio, kaku, mullet, etc. thrive. Catch and keep --> you fight the fish just once. Catch and release --> you fight the fish many times, plus its offspring for years and years to come!
on June 18,2013 | 11:41AM
Royabell wrote:
Thank you fishman20, there needs to be some type of control. Bag limits and seasons would be great. As few as 15 years ago we could go fishing and allways catch some fish for dinner. Now when we go out lucky we get any, still nice to be on the ocean, the fish is a bonus......
on June 18,2013 | 12:01PM
juscasting wrote:
Carl Jellings is just justifying his over fishing tactics of surround any school of fish with hundreds of feet of gill nets from his boat. See them many times on the west side come mere yards from the shore to surround entire schools of Oi 'o and Akule! Hypocrites!
on June 18,2013 | 12:25PM
holokanaka wrote:
"Hawaiians caught 3 times more fish annually than what scientists considered sustainable in modern times......" they had a kapu (restriction and type of fish) caught and of course much cleaner ocean waters. google
on June 18,2013 | 02:05PM
Fishermen wrote:
Unfortunately, judgements are made when people see only a fraction of what is going on. People are seeing things from standing on shore and can't see the tons of fish he leaves in the water. He knows very well how much can be taken at a sustainable level but he is always seen as the bad guy because people see his catch and cannot comprehend just how much more is out there. Next time you see him, you would learn a lot about fishing and the ocean by talking with him. He would be a hypocrite if he was saying these things while just standing on the shore and not as a result of a lifetime of fishing knowledge and being in the water observing. By standing on shore and watching you are seeing 10% of what's really happening.
on June 18,2013 | 03:31PM
FISHMAN20 wrote:
There is no question that most of the fishers are reasonable and ethical about these things, but there are a lot that are not. And those people can, and do, a lot of damage. There are a lot of people who are avid fishers and spend massive amounts of time in and on the ocean that recognize things are not being done right. They are not on the shore pontificating, they are in the ocean and they see it all.
on June 18,2013 | 04:26PM
pigo wrote:
I guess you don't realize Carl Jellings fights for fisherman's right to fish more than anyone else out there! Yeah he takes a lot of fish it's also his job... that's his bread and butter! He also is more knowledgeable than people realize. The last thing he wants is no fish!! Think about it!! He has to be practicing some kind of conservation so he has fish to take another day!! It's his livelihood!!
on June 18,2013 | 10:26PM
Reade1 wrote:
Again over development, over populated, poor federal, state and county planning and no respect. When come to big money development no problem. The carpetbaggers control everything, from no respect for iwi, no respect for environment, no respect for shoreline, no respect for reefs, no respect with chemical run offs from golf courses during heavy rains, no respect for sewage overflow etc...Although they say they did environmental studies before they started construction but no studies after the construction and the impact of its surroundings. Federal development destroyed Pearl Harbor from everything in the realm of marine life. Pearl harbor was the main house for marine life. But you don't hear about it because it is Federal. All the many years of plantation run off and new construction run off it was considered okay.. Why go after the fisherman who is making a living and feeding his family? Go after the guy's who destroyed Oahu's marine life. Every south pacific immigrant eat fish that is their diet, mostly all Asians eat fish and that population have exceed and more to come with all the new construction for high raises and Federal assistance for qualified immigrants. It's not the fisherman its money that changes the natural environment cycle of all living species. So all you good complaining guy's go to Pearl Harbor and argue your point about the marine life that disappeared. We are all responsible for the decline of fish.
on June 19,2013 | 03:56AM
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