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Language a barrier for tests at Hawaiian charter school

By Jennifer Sinco Kelleher / Associated Press

POSTED:

STAR-ADVERTISER / January 2011Kauanoe Kamana, principal of Nawahiokalaniopuu Iki, a charter school on Hawaii island, said her school's low ranking is due to lack of suitable tests.

A Big Island charter school that educates students in the Hawaiian language claims the state Department of Education's recently released rankings unfairly imply the school is failing.

Nawahiokalaniopuu Iki, known as Nawahi for short, scored 20 out of a possible 400 in the state's new performance system, which measures schools on multiple factors, including chronic absenteeism and science proficiency.

Principal Kauanoe Kamana blames the low score on a lack of appropriate Hawaiian-language tests, which has led the majority of parents at her school to boycott the state's assessments. She said the deparment should explain that when releasing the list.

"To be listed at the bottom of the list indicates a lack of connection between our Department of Education's English testing and the strengths we have in Hawaiian-medium education," she said. "We have not as a state come to grips with assessment issues relative to our two official languages of our state."

Kamana's concern highlights problems of developing suitable assessments for students at schools that use the Hawaiian language, said Tom Hutton, executive director of the State Public Charter School Commission. "That's been a thorny issue long before Strive HI," he said of the state's new performance system, which released its first report card last week.

The Department of Education is working to tackle the complex issue with help from funds appropriated by the state Legislature, spokeswoman Donalyn Dela Cruz said.

"We recognize the need for a culturally appropriate assessment for immersion schools," she said. "The challenge is while Hawaiian is an official language, not all words translate into Hawaiian. The language is beautifully and uniquely layered. Some schools, depending on location, may know a word differently than another."

In a continuing effort of revitalizing Hawaiian, a growing number of schools are offering an education that centers on the language. About half of the state's 33 charter schools are Hawaiian-focused or Hawaiian-immersion.

There are also Hawaiian immersion schools and programs within the department. Some use tests that are in English, while others are willing to use assessments translated into Hawaiian.

Nawahi, which has 275 students, provides the state assessments, but the vast majority of parents opt not to have their children take them, Kamana said, because they want a test that is developed in Hawaiian.

"Translation is problematic — grammatically, structurally and culturally," Kamana said.

The Keaau-based school recently started a satellite program in Nanakuli on Oahu because a group of parents wanted more Hawaiian-language options on the Waianae Coast. The program is starting with five kindergarteners who were graduates of Punana Leo o Waianae, a Hawaiian-language preschool.

Translating a test isn't equitable because the Hawaiian translation tends to be longer and could affect the time it takes a student to complete a test, said Kalehua Caceres, the preschool's director, who led the effort to bring Nawahi to Oahu.

"The way we educate our children reflects our values," she said. "It depends on who's translating and how it's being translated. Traditionally there were different dialects."

The issue of assessment language had been a problem for Nawahi before the state rolled out its new system. Under No Child Left Behind, which relies mostly on reading and math scores, Nawahi was in "school improvement status."

In a letter to Lyndsay Pinkus, chief of staff to the department's deputy superintendent, Kamana said high school students educated at Nawahi have a 100 percent graduation rate and an 80 percent college attendance rate.

But Pinkus responded that while the high school students are indeed performing very well, they couldn't be counted in Nawahi's score because those students are technically considered enrolled at Hilo High School. Nawahi's contract with the charter school commission is for kindergarten through eighth grade.

Because of its small student population, privacy laws prevent the state from publicly releasing details about Nawahi's score.





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Kauanoe Kamana




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MalamaKaAina wrote:
Does anyone know any millionaires that are fluent in the Hawaiian Language?
on August 26,2013 | 02:58AM
Bdpapa wrote:
Yes!
on August 26,2013 | 04:59AM
hanalei395 wrote:
They may not become "millionaires", but students, people fluent in `olelo Hawai`i are very happy that they are keeping the language alive.
on August 26,2013 | 05:58AM
eoe wrote:
Yes, poor people are often happier than rich ones.
on August 26,2013 | 06:26AM
soundofreason wrote:
as they cash their "benefit" checks.
on August 26,2013 | 07:05AM
hanalei395 wrote:
As a poor person yourself, you should know.
on August 26,2013 | 07:11AM
soundofreason wrote:
That and a 1.25 will get you a cup of coffee.
on August 26,2013 | 07:06AM
WooWoo wrote:
I think it is fantastic that students are taught to be fluent in Hawaiian. However, if they are ONLY fluent in Hawaiian and not in english, then shame on their parents for making the decision to cripple their ability to function in the larger part of society.
on August 26,2013 | 09:07AM
aomohoa wrote:
Common sense comment. Mahalo
on August 26,2013 | 09:38AM
allie wrote:
agree...bilingual is great..monolingual is not good. Other problem is that monolingualism chases out non-Hawaiians who won't stay if they are not ready for real-time careers or college.
on August 26,2013 | 01:13PM
Fred01 wrote:
Way to go! Keeping Hawaiians down! This makes about as much sense as having a Latin charter school, and is nothing short of child neglect.
on August 26,2013 | 11:21AM
allie wrote:
Keeping the language alive is good but there is far more to a high school education than proficiency in Hawaiian. We need to know far more about these immersion schools to know with confidence how well they are serving children as opposed to the ideologies of teachers and parents.
on August 26,2013 | 01:12PM
palani wrote:
I'm sure there are, but English is the international language of commerce and success.
on August 26,2013 | 04:59AM
hanalei395 wrote:
In the last half of the 19th, Hawai'i was among the most literate in the world. Almost everyone of the Hawaiian people could speak, read and write in both perfect English and Hawaiian.
on August 26,2013 | 08:43AM
palani wrote:
Yes, and what a remarkable testament to the innate intelligence, openness, and intellectual curiosity of the great Hawaiian people.
on August 26,2013 | 08:50AM
hanalei395 wrote:
Sorry, that's 19th CENTURY.
on August 26,2013 | 09:26AM
eoe wrote:
So what happened?
on August 26,2013 | 09:36AM
hanalei395 wrote:
Manifest Destiny and annexation.. Hawai'i is no longer Hawaiian but is now Anglo/Saxon. White supremacy rules.
on August 26,2013 | 09:54AM
eoe wrote:
That doesn't explain why literacy rates dropped.
on August 26,2013 | 10:25AM
hanalei395 wrote:
Who said literacy dropped? Hawai'i was ONCE a bilingual nation.
on August 26,2013 | 10:43AM
eoe wrote:
Well if Hawaiians used to be 100% literate, and now some studies find that has dropped to 70%, then I would say literacy has dropped.
on August 26,2013 | 11:03AM
hanalei395 wrote:
Go and study some more of your own "studies".
on August 26,2013 | 11:19AM
eoe wrote:
Published by Kamehameha Schools. http://www.ksbe.edu/spi/Hulili/Hulili_vol_6/9_Asset_Building_Among_Native_Hawaiians.pdf
on August 26,2013 | 01:36PM
MakaniKai wrote:
@hanalei395 wrote: Hawai'i is no longer Hawaiian but is now Anglo/Saxon. White supremacy rules. LOL !!! Maybe at the turn of the 20th century. C’mon since statehood not the case. True Hawaii is no longer Hawaiian rather under the samurai rule of the usual suspects………White supremacy rule in Hawaii, Really???? Provide examples since statehood.
on August 26,2013 | 11:21AM
hanalei395 wrote:
I meant that ... AT THE TIME ... THE U.S. TOOK OVER HAWAI'I. .... Sorry.
on August 26,2013 | 11:40AM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
MakaniKai, you appear to be prejudiced against Americans of Japanese Ancestry. That is a shame, because it is the post-world war two democratic party, led primarily by a poor mainland born Irishman (Gov. Burns) who grew up okay in a single parent household in Kalihi, largely due to the generosity of a part Hawaiian military officer named Col. Kupau, and democrats of part-Hawaiian ancestry, like the Heen family and the Trask family, who coordinated what you call the usual suspects samurai against the Hawaiian alii, such as Prince Kuhio and the Kawanakoa family, who were coopted by the Republicans from the Homerule party, and the sugar planter Kamaaina whites, and brought Hawaii from a dictatorship Territory, whose governor was NOT elected, but rather appointed by the U.S. president, to a twentieth century democracy.
on August 26,2013 | 01:24PM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
Hanalei395, I believe that your comments that the Hawaiians were among the most literate of nations; and that Manifest Destiny annexation were the downfall of Hawaiian literacy, are inaccurate. It is interesting that my wife (who is 1/2 native Hawaiian and was raised in Waianae) and were just discussing these issues this morning. Pre-Western contact Hawaiian culture, like all Polynesian cultures, was an illiterate culture. The only reason why the written Hawaiian language was developed was to teach the native Hawaiians the Christian Bible. Manifest Destiny was the American policy that rationalized the invasion and annexation what was then Mexican California, Oregon, Washington state, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. Annexation of Hawaii was driven by some but NOT all of the sugar planters, who wanted to escapte the 2 cent a ton tax on foreign sugar. The biggest sugar planter, Klaus Spreckles (of Sprecklesville, Maui fame) was in favor of keeping the Hawaiian kingdom in tact since he owned King Kalakaua since Kalakaua and the Hawaiian kingdom owed Spreckles over $1 million, thus allowing Kalakaua to force Kalakaua to do anything Spreckles to do anything he wanted.
on August 26,2013 | 01:04PM
allie wrote:
Missionary schools were all bilingual. That is what we should have today
on August 26,2013 | 01:15PM
hanalei395 wrote:
Did you understand what I posted? I said that at the LAST HALF of the 19th century, Hawai'i was among the most literate in the world. And I DID NOT say that the U.S. annexation was the "downfall" of Hawaiian literacy. Hawai'i was once a bilingual nation. And once Hawai'i lost its independence, American "commissioners" sent to Hawai'i, banned the Hawaiian language in schools. Literacy among the Hawaiian people did not go down, but Hawai'i being a bilingual nation was gone.
on August 26,2013 | 01:50PM
hanalei395 wrote:
And BTW, Manifest Destiny was the American policy of a land for people of Anglo/Saxon heritage, from the East Coast of the continent to the West. But after reaching the West Coast, Manifest Destiny didn't stop there. It was then on to the Caribean, then across the Pacific, to Hawai'i, and all the way to the Phililpines.
on August 26,2013 | 02:49PM
MakaniKai wrote:
How does pointing out the obvious translate to prejudice? Livin’ in 2013 and know who runs the nei today and the names of the distant past resonate very little with today’s Hawaii.
on August 26,2013 | 03:25PM
kailua000 wrote:
of course we were the most literate..we have such a small alphabet! LOL
on August 26,2013 | 05:56PM
hanalei395 wrote:
Literate in BOTH English and Hawaiian.
on August 26,2013 | 06:50PM
kailua000 wrote:
look around, there are more asians and other poly's in Hawaii than their are whites. so "the man' is keeping them down, keeping them from opening a book and reading, learning? whats the excuse?
on August 26,2013 | 05:55PM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
Hanalei395, my comments on the history of the Hawaiian people and nation are by no means meant to trivialize your comments. I made those comments only to demonstrate that the Hawaiian language education problem, the fact that the State of Hawaii constitution recognizes the Hawaiian language as a co-equal official language of the State of Hawaii, and the need to preserve the speaking and writing of the Hawaiian language are complex issues for which there are no simple answers. For example, all of the entries in the Mahele Book, the legal document from which all fee simple ownership of land emanates from, and the first conveyances of land after the great mahele, are all written solely in the Hawaiian language. That is one practical reason why the Hawaiian language must be one of the official languages of the State of Hawaii, for if it were not, all land conveyances in Hawaii, especially the conveyances involving the huge tracts of land owned by the big five, would be void. Likewise, if the Hawaiian language became extinct, then there would be no one to translate these deeds and leases, thereby making resolutions over land conveyances impossible. I think that the hardest problem is translating arithmetic, mathematics and western science into the Hawaiian language so that students in Hawaiian charter schools can pass the Hawaii State educational examinations.
on August 26,2013 | 06:26PM
DiverDave wrote:
After the arrival of the missionaries and their tireless work at devising a only spoken Polynesian-After the arrival of the missionaries and their tireless work at devising a only spoken Polynesian-Hawaiian language to a written one, they proceeded, by direction of the Kings, Kamehameha II, and the III, to start schools all over the islands. By the late 1840′s there were over 500 schools, and all taught exclusively in Polynesian-Hawaiian. Hawaii was then known as the third most literate area of the world, only behind Scotland, and New England. What a great job the missionaries did! But, it was Kamehameha IV who saw that Polynesian language was not useful to participating on the world stage as Polynesian was spoken no were else. In his first speech to a joint session of the Hawaii Legislature Kamehameha IV called for English to be taught in the schools and used throughout the islands. All speeches and bills in the Hawaiian Kingdom Legislature from the 1860′s up until the 1940′s in the Territorial Congress were spoken and printed in both English and Polynesian-Hawaiian. As the Kings continued to bring 10s of thousands of foreign workers here in order to fill their tax coffers there needed to be a common language used by all. English became that language. Excerpt of Kamehameha IV’s speech given in English and Hawaiian at the opening of the Legislature, April 7, 1855: “It is of the highest importance, in my opinion, that education in the English language should become more general, for it is my firm conviction that unless my subjects become educated in this tongue, their hope of intellectual progress, and of meeting the foreigners on terms of equality, is a vain one”.
on August 26,2013 | 10:40AM
DiverDave wrote:
eoe, it was a very conscious decision by the last four Kings and Queen to change over to English. After traveling the world, they all realized that you could order a cup of coffee in France with English, but not in Polynesian-Hawaiian. All diplomats spoke English, as well as traders, and Hawaii's main trading partner, the United States.
on August 26,2013 | 10:55AM
DiverDave wrote:
Many sovereignty activists today like to claim "they stole our language". Well history shows that long before the revolution of 1893, Hawaii was well on its way to speaking English as the common language. They had to. Just examine the demographics of the population here in the second half of the 1800s. In 1896 there were 109,020 total people in Hawaii. Out of that number 69,516 were either born here to "foreign" parents or born elsewhere. There were almost 20,000 Chinese, 23,000 Japanese, 8,300 from Portugal, and surprising enough only 2,266 from the United States.(See: Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1178-1965, by Robert C. Schmitt, U of H Press, 1968)
on August 26,2013 | 11:14AM
hanalei395 wrote:
DiverDave, who is part Indian, and who wants to be known as a "Hawaiian", calls real Hawaiians .... "Polynesian-Hawaiians", an unnecessary redundancy. .... For Hawaiians to be called "Indians", would be the ultimate INSULT. And DiverDave, being an Indian, is probably why he wants to be a "Hawaiian".
on August 26,2013 | 11:09AM
DiverDave wrote:
When speaking about the Polynesian language, one must clarify the location. Polynesian spoken in Tahiti is definitely a different dialect than Polynesian-Hawaiian is.
on August 26,2013 | 11:19AM
hanalei395 wrote:
DiverDave, who is part Indian, is ashamed to learn to speak Indian.
on August 26,2013 | 11:25AM
DiverDave wrote:
hanalei395 is just trying to stir up racial animosity where there is none. This is the problem anytime one tries to have an intelligent discussion with folks that have race on the brain. This is not about race, but about the common language, English, and why it was chosen to be spoken here in Hawaii.
on August 26,2013 | 11:46AM
hanalei395 wrote:
DiverDave wants to be a "Hawaiian". But absolutely NO Hawaiian wants to be like DiverDave, an Indian.
on August 26,2013 | 11:54AM
DiverDave wrote:
I rest my case about hanalei395.
on August 26,2013 | 11:57AM
hanalei395 wrote:
Which means ....DiverDave gave up.
on August 26,2013 | 12:13PM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
Hanalei395, perhaps it is not so bad for native Hawaiians to be called American Indians for federal law purposes. That re-naming appears to be a viable alternative to creating a Hawaiian nation within a nation since the Akaka bill has been successfully blocked by the Republicans.
on August 26,2013 | 01:33PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
To tell you the truth, I never heard of Polynesian-Hawaiian? Where does DD get this from? Oh my, is that the same DD?
on August 26,2013 | 02:33PM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
Hanalei395, I did understand your your prior posts. In a post below, you specifically stated that annexation was the downfall of the Hawaiian language. As for manifest destiny, virtually all credible historians view that annexation of Hawaii not to be an extension of the manifest destiny doctrine, in which god gave American the "divine" right to conquer non-white peoples land, but rather straight out imperialism -- the difference being that imperialism does not rely on god giving Americans the "green light" to steal non-white peoples' land, but rather on the simple barbarian concept that might makes right. Regarding your statement that after annexation the bilingual nature of Hawaii went down, that is incorrect, after annexation, bilingualism was at an all time high. Because of American government rule, the makaainana could vote. Under Kalakaua's constitution only white men and alii could vote. Because makaainana could vote, their Homerule party had a majority of both the House and Senate. They wold often vote to convert the debate from English to Hawaiian thus befuddling the white men who were in the minority in both houses.
on August 26,2013 | 07:07PM
allie wrote:
wow..Dave is akamai in real history. UH Hawaiian "Studies" would never allow you to say the above.
on August 26,2013 | 01:16PM
eoe wrote:
exactly
on August 26,2013 | 01:37PM
hanalei395 wrote:
Indians should stick with their own history.
on August 26,2013 | 02:07PM
DiverDave wrote:
With hanalei395 it's all about race. That would make her a what?
on August 26,2013 | 10:19PM
WooWoo wrote:
Guaranteed, someone is going to sue a prospective employer very soon about being discriminated against because of inability to read/write english when Hawaiian is one of the official languages of the state. There's already that guy suing about the speeding ticket. "My client asked for an application in Hawaiian, one of the official languages in the state, and when none was made available to him, his civil and cultural rights were violated."
on August 26,2013 | 11:18AM
allie wrote:
Hawaiians today are descendants of the raiders who enslaved the indigenous Marquesans and stole their land. It is an outrageous record actually.
on August 26,2013 | 01:18PM
hanalei395 wrote:
allie is a desendant of a stupid Indian.
on August 26,2013 | 02:09PM
hanalei395 wrote:
Or, a descendant of stupid Indians.
on August 26,2013 | 02:17PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
Mandans were called the "White Indians" ask Allie why. Some Welsh prince got in the village why the men were hunting buffalos.
on August 26,2013 | 02:38PM
allie wrote:
..and love....:)
on August 26,2013 | 01:14PM
Kaluu wrote:
Yes, I've known some very successful (financially speaking) people who were fluent in Hawaiian. They were truly multilingual.
on August 26,2013 | 06:15AM
Ronin006 wrote:
Yes, there are always exceptions to every rule.
on August 26,2013 | 08:53AM
DanielO wrote:
With a logon name like yours - "MalamaKaAina" - one would think that you know the culture is not materially based. Your comment is nonsense; you may not understand the culture as those who live it.
on August 26,2013 | 06:21AM
aomohoa wrote:
Agree. I didn't get the point to the comment, but it sure stirred things up.
on August 26,2013 | 09:40AM
pueohonua wrote:
What a shallow comment! Now, do I understand that you are a millionaire MalamaKaAina? Is this the measuring metric for success? Are you a econometrician that knows how to value internal rates of return and valuations in structuring capitalization?
on August 26,2013 | 07:25AM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
Yes, one of the CEOs for Hawaiian Dredging, a white man, was very fluent in the Hawaiian language and was a multi-millionaire.
on August 26,2013 | 12:43PM
palani wrote:
Boycotting the state assessment tests is tantamount to withdrawing from society. Success will not come from self-imposed isolation but rather from embracing the world as it is. The choice for immersion may be available, but is it wise?
on August 26,2013 | 04:58AM
inHilo wrote:
If everyone embraced the world as "it is," there would be no change.
on August 26,2013 | 05:29AM
palani wrote:
No, the opposite is true. Isolation and "self-sufficiency" usually lead to decline and collapse.
on August 26,2013 | 08:53AM
allie wrote:
palani is so smart!
on August 26,2013 | 01:20PM
palani wrote:
;)
on August 26,2013 | 02:14PM
soundofreason wrote:
Simple answer here. Boycott their funding.
on August 26,2013 | 07:07AM
hanalei395 wrote:
To make it simple and more frustrating for you ... that's not going to happen.
on August 26,2013 | 09:40AM
Fred01 wrote:
You are all over the place with your ignorant comments? How can someone so dumb be so opinionated and wrong about everything?
on August 26,2013 | 11:23AM
hanalei395 wrote:
My stalker, Fred, follows me, and goes "all over the place" with me.
on August 26,2013 | 12:28PM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
If the school chooses to boycott the state test, then the state should defund the school and those teachers and principal and parents can create their own private school or send their kids to another public school that understands the rules.
on August 26,2013 | 09:21AM
allie wrote:
I am Mandan and indigenous native American. My mom would never have allowed me to boycott Head Start of my public school where English was spoken. We are proud of our ethnicity but also realistic about the world. It is the immersion children who will suffer if they are not allowed to be bilingual and bi-cultural.
on August 26,2013 | 01:20PM
palani wrote:
Well stated. Your mom should be very proud of how far you've come. The future is bright!
on August 26,2013 | 02:17PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
Ppppplat flat tire.
on August 26,2013 | 02:40PM
Bdpapa wrote:
This testing issue needs to be taken care of. If the State is going to offer immersion programs, they need to treat them just like the English speaking schools. That means testing should be in the language taught. This also brings into play teachers evaluations. The Hawaiia Immersion teachers are at a disadvantage. They teach in Hawaiian but the students test in English. The student are not going to do well and this affects the teachers in there evaluations.
on August 26,2013 | 05:02AM
palani wrote:
From the article: "The challenge is while Hawaiian is an official language, not all words translate into Hawaiian."

This is especially true for scientific, technological, and mathematical terms and concepts.


on August 26,2013 | 08:58AM
Bdpapa wrote:
Yes, but that's where the work with each other. These are distinct definitions.
on August 26,2013 | 10:08AM
eoe wrote:
"The way we educate our children reflects our values," she said. "It depends on who's translating and how it's being translated. Traditionally there were different dialects." This is not unique to Hawaiian, every single language on earth has different dialects. Then, at some point, someone creates the "standard form" of the language and while you can speak however you want, the written form becomes the one that is tested on. So if what you are saying is that there is no standard form, then what are you doing educating children in that language? This just sounds like a bunch of excuses for mediocrity to me. And of course, now that it is wrapped up in Hawaiian language you have the ability, when challenged about the lack of standards, to accuse the people asking of ethnocentric bias. After all Hawaiian is such a special, layered and complex thing, and was traditionally an oral language, so no barbarous white person could possibly understand its uniqueness and even asking for a standard form and meaningful tests would be tantamount to ethnic and cultural imperialism.
on August 26,2013 | 05:21AM
false wrote:
The Immersion scores verify the inequities of the DOE for administration and development of Hawaiian as the language of Hawaii. English is the language of economics. Hawaiian is the language of the culture the economy sustains its benefit from. When is Hawaiian going to have its own Superintendent line and support staff? There is no po`o for the development of curriculum that fits all the campuses. By nature Hawaiian is insular to the island it is on except to O`ahu which has an exponential politic of players that choose to design the language. The most ludicrous of which is inserting contrived Hawaiian for today's technology as is assigning some made up representation for "molecular generations". The aboriginal language should be preserved for those attributes that are culturally esteemed. Reality is English is the language of global access to science and technology and math. Hawaiians of 200 years ago and more were so ready to move on and be more than Hawaiian speaking. They were multi-lingual. Why aren't we?
on August 26,2013 | 05:22AM
MakaniKai wrote:
@false hits the nail on the head: “English is the language of economics. Hawaiian is the language of the culture the economy sustains its benefit from" Both have a place and until 'Olelo Hawai'i becomes widely used and not just given a official language status via the state it may not be taken seriously. Shame on the DOE - the language immersion schools did not just pop up. Once again poor performance by the DOE - with little Polynesian representation. The Hawaiian culture continues to fade away - 'olelo Hawaii is the breath of life.
on August 26,2013 | 12:43PM
Steve96785 wrote:
Perhaps all schools in Hawaii should be required to teach Hawaiian and English. That would give all of us a way to explain the state's annual poor performance compared to nearly every state. Another option might be to create a third diploma which would celebrate those who never plan to be able to compete for jobs outside of the islands or even many of the better jobs in the islands. Some schools could go back to the practice of teaching in Pidgin, which is a recognized Creole language. Or everyone could step up to get a real education that could include Hawaiian, English plus at least six years of Chinese, Japanese, or some other major world language, with fluency required in all three. Swiss schools require fluency in five for graduation.
on August 26,2013 | 05:28AM
salsacoquibx wrote:
I had some of my friends kids that went to hawaiian charter schools, which I agree its good to learn your native language, but not at the expense of sacrificing the English language. Sadly these kids grew up and didn't know how to read a simple job application. Which none are in Hawaiian, how can they teach one language and NOT the other is something thats hard to understand. When Hawaii is part of the union and English is your bread n butter also in this state.
on August 26,2013 | 05:31AM
Macadamiamac wrote:
1
on August 26,2013 | 08:30AM
WooWoo wrote:
I agree. It is both valuable and possible to honor your past while preparing for the future. I think everyone agrees that if these schools are producing multi-lingual graduates (english and hawaiian), that is fantastic. If they are producing graduates fluent only in Hawaiian, then these parents and educators at the Hawaiian language only schools are doing a great disservice to the children.
on August 26,2013 | 09:04AM
Kailuaraised wrote:
I find it funny that many of the world's rich send their kids to the US or English speaking schools so they can learn to speak english and grow up to be competent in the business world. Immersion schools seem bent on setting their students up for failure. Proper well spoken English is the language of the world economy. Why does the state and the liberals insist on programs like these? Hawaiian is a dead language. Learn it for a hobby if it's important to you.
on August 26,2013 | 06:03AM
hanalei395 wrote:
That was the goal when the U.S. "annexd" Hawai'i, making the Hawaiian language a "dead language". Students in public schools were scolded, belittled, mocked when they caught speaking Hawaiian on campus.
on August 26,2013 | 06:50AM
Kailuaraised wrote:
Hawaiian language is a dead language. People should accept that it will not ever be a player in the work force or economy. That's fine if someone wants to speak it. However, kids need to learn proper english skills to succeed. And by proper I don't mean pidgin english with no grammar or structure.
on August 26,2013 | 07:19AM
hanalei395 wrote:
When Kailuaraised is dead, the Hawaiian language will sitll be alive.
on August 26,2013 | 07:32AM
aomohoa wrote:
The language and the culture should be passed on. It's a good thing in any culture. Never forget your roots.
on August 26,2013 | 09:42AM
Bdpapa wrote:
I agree. This language base should be broaden to all public school children. It does not have to be as intense as Immersion learning but can be developed gradually until they can be conversational.
on August 26,2013 | 10:11AM
eoe wrote:
There are ways to not forget your roots that don't involve clinging to the past and crippling your future.
on August 26,2013 | 10:26AM
allie wrote:
Make sure the roots being taught are actual and real though. Lot of the immersion schools with their hatred and envy of English are poisoning minds. Radicalized faculty on state payrolls are amusing when you think how phony they are.
on August 26,2013 | 01:22PM
Kailuaraised wrote:
You can remember your roots and still learn proper English.
on August 26,2013 | 03:02PM
EducatedLocalBoy wrote:
hanalei395, the Hawaii language had a rebirth after annexation until the Hawaiian traitor Prince Kuhio defected from the Hawaiian Homerule party of Robert Wilcox and went over to the white sugar and pineapple planter Republican party. Since after annexation, all Hawaiians could vote, under the Kalakaua kingdom only Hawaiian alii and whites could vote, the Wilcox Homerule party, of which Kuhio was originally a part of, the Hawaiians ruled the new annexation government. Kuhio's 30 pieces of silver price to switch from the Homerule party to the Republican party was a slap on the back and all the brandy and cigars he could dring and smoke. It is a great irony that Kuhio's campaign slogan against Wilcox was nana ika ili kou (look to the dark skin) referring to the fact that he was pure Hawaiian whereas Wilcox was hapa Hawaiian. Wilcox as 1/2 Hawaiian 1/2 white was a truer Hawaiian than the 100% Hawaiian Kuhio.
on August 26,2013 | 01:45PM
Kaluu wrote:
Anyone who has had exposure to the genius of the Hawaiian language other than knowing a few dozen words surely has a strong desire that the use of the language be revived. Yet, surely, we must not restrict the children's futures to primitive life that prevents adaptation to modern complexities. I would like to hear a discussion of the problems involved by those who are far more knowledgeable than I about the difficulties involved in providing both fluency in Hawaiian and everything else that best equips a student for life in the world as it now is.
on August 26,2013 | 06:14AM
tutulois wrote:
I think multi-lingual is the key here. Unless they are educating people to live on Niihau, these schools need to make certain that the students are fluent in both Hawaiian and English (and other languages, for that matter, in an increasingly global culture).
on August 26,2013 | 06:50AM
soundofreason wrote:
Need to think about the ending FUNCTIONAL destination of these students.
on August 26,2013 | 07:14AM
whs1966 wrote:
This comes down to the key question: What are schools for? If the primary purpose of the schools is to perpetuate `olelo Hawaii--and, as others have commented--to make people happy, then don't worry about the standardized assessments in `olalo hoaole. If on, the other hand, one believes the primary purpose of the schools is to produce graduates with top employment skills, then the schools must do whatever they can to make sure the graduates do well on the assessments.
on August 26,2013 | 06:53AM
Grimbold wrote:
To teach Hawaiian language is an optional luxury when there is not even enough time to properly teach students science, math chemistry, reading and writing.
on August 26,2013 | 07:24AM
tim5fl wrote:
True,teaching hawaiian is just a waste of time,useless.
on August 26,2013 | 08:19AM
aomohoa wrote:
SO keeping a culture alive is a waste of time? Dumb comment. Maybe it should be an after school program, but it is important.
on August 26,2013 | 09:43AM
eoe wrote:
Sorry, once someone talks about preserving a culture or a language it is too late. There are languages and cultures dying out all over the world.
on August 26,2013 | 10:28AM
8082062424 wrote:
The reason for that is those people gave up and let that happen. not every one will give up
on August 26,2013 | 12:11PM
allie wrote:
keep it alive but keep it real hon
on August 26,2013 | 01:22PM
Grimbold wrote:
Stop saying hon - it is condescending.
on August 26,2013 | 05:04PM
soundofreason wrote:
Thought it was just me. Gonna end all my replies to her with "toots".
on August 26,2013 | 07:52PM
joseph007 wrote:
sure, just because the students don't understand English, they fail. wow..... unfair.
on August 26,2013 | 08:38AM
Ronin006 wrote:
Educating kids to fail in live makes no sense. I suppose educating kids in Hawaiian language has some use if they look forward to a profession as a hula dancer or lei greeter, but beyond that???????
on August 26,2013 | 08:52AM
8082062424 wrote:
teachers for the next generation
on August 26,2013 | 09:22AM
Kalaheo1 wrote:
Any school in the state that refuses to cooperate with the State and the taxpayers who pay for it should lose funding. There are plenty of private schools here, but there's always room for one more. Other people choose to home school, but a state school needs to cooperate with the state..
on August 26,2013 | 09:18AM
ptofview wrote:
You can assess all you want in Hawaiian, bottom line, the rest of the world recognizes English. Try getting into college without proficient English language and skills. Parents are doing a disservice to their child(ren) if they don't work within national criteria.
on August 26,2013 | 10:00AM
eoe wrote:
They don't think they are part of this nation.
on August 26,2013 | 10:29AM
Kailuaraised wrote:
But they gladly take the homestead land and welfare checks!
on August 26,2013 | 03:03PM
MakaniKai wrote:
I have travelled to countries developed and undeveloped where you DO NOT find signage in English. When one travels to the nei signage should be in ‘olelo Hawaii and English. Travel today with smart phones makes it easier to communicate in other than your mother tongue. Until ‘olelo Hawaii has a greater spoken and understood presence the culture of these islands will continue to fade away – and we might as well shift to the other side of date line as that is where we seem to be headed! Auē hoʻi au!
on August 26,2013 | 12:57PM
kailua000 wrote:
its great for them to learn the Hawaiian language, but the students from these schools regularly score very low on the critical reading and writing on the SAT. If they want to go to college, they need to be proficient in these languages, just as the students in American Samoa are expected to be.
on August 26,2013 | 05:53PM
homeka55 wrote:
Ke hi'i la 'oe i ka pauku waena,he neo ke po'o me ka hi'u...
on August 26,2013 | 09:48PM
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