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Wednesday, October 22, 2014         

KOKUA LINE


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Permits needed to sell crafts on state and city beaches

By June Watanabe

POSTED:



Question: Are you able to sell craft items, made by you, on North Shore beaches? I asked a police officer, and he only knew it was illegal in Waikiki.

Answer: The Department of Land and Natural Resources requires a permit for any commercial activity on state beaches or other "unencumbered public lands."

Unencumbered public lands are those that are not leased, set aside to agencies or otherwise encumbered. They include beach and coastal areas not under the jurisdiction of another government agency.

Examples of commercial activity requiring a permit are a beach wedding, baby christening, the scattering of ashes or the teaching of a hula class.

The only commercial activity authorized by DLNR on Oahu beaches is the concession on Duke Kahanamoku Beach in Waikiki, said spokeswoman Deborah Ward.

However, many North Shore beaches have been conveyed to the city under state executive orders. Those beaches are not considered unencumbered public lands, so the state's rules and regulations don't apply, Ward said.

The city does not issue permits to anyone wishing to peddle crafts or any other kind of merchandise on its beaches, said Craig Mayeda, administrator of Parks Maintenance and Recreation Services for the Department of Parks and Recreation.

Under its rules and regulations, "only authorized commercial activities" are allowed within city parks, which include beach areas. Those activities include those authorized or controlled by concession, contract or as part of a city-sponsored program.

You can find the city rules at www1.honolulu.gov/parks/rules/commercial_acts.pdf and information about state permits at dlnr.ehawaii.gov/permits/welcome.html.

Q: Do we need to go in person to the state ID office to renew our ID cards, or can we do it by mail?

A: You can renew by mail only if you are 65 years old or older, obtained an ID card after Nov. 1, 1998, and have no change in name or citizenship.

You can call 587-3112 to verify whether you are eligible.

If you are a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident alien and have your current ID card with no change in name and citizenship, all you have to do is complete and mail in the application form. No other documents are required.

If everything is in order, you should get your card within 10 business days.

Those who are not U.S. citizens or permanent resident aliens must bring in a current passport with a valid I-94 card, Form I-20 or Form IAP.

For more information about obtaining a state ID card, call 587-3111 or go to hawaii.gov/ag/hcjdc/main/hawaii_id_cards.

Mahalo

To two women who called for help when I passed out in the downstairs women's restroom at Sears Ala Moana on May 21. I was taken to the Queen's Medical Center via ambulance and hospitalized. My husband was not able to get their names. To the two angels, may you both have many blessings. -- Shirley C.

Auwe

To the person who walks her dog up the Anini Place cul-de-sac in Pacific Palisades and tosses dog poop in an unsealed bag in a container inside my yard. The container is not a trash can. You are trespassing by reaching over my fence and opening the container. Throw the poop into your own trash can. Shame on you. -- Disgusted Neighbor


Write to "Kokua Line" at Honolulu Star-Advertiser, 7 Waterfront Plaza, Suite 210, 500 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu 96813; call 529-4773; fax 529-4750; or email kokualine@staradvertiser.com.






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