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Swap meet needs better oversight


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, May 01, 2012

~~<p>Aloha Stadium is among the nation's busiest sports venues, but swap meets bring in twice the revenue than from spectator events in the stadium. However, the state's legislative auditor alleges that &quot;commercial purposes&quot; other than stadium concessions violate federal restrictions, just one of many serious questions being raised about the current swap meet operation. Further investigation is needed to determine the legality of the activities on the stadium's parking lot, and into accusations that stadium management has been terribly lax.</p>
<p>Revenues from the Aloha Stadium Swap Meet &amp; Marketplace fell from a high of $5.4 million in sales in fiscal 2007-2008 to $4.8 million in 2009-2010, some of which might be attributable to the national and local recession. However, state Auditor Marion Higa has issued a scathing report, calling Centerplate, the Connecticut-based swap meet manager, &quot;derelict in its performance.&quot; The Stadium Authority also is accused of mismanagement and allowing 26 vendors to operate without tax licenses and one-third of the top 450 vendors neglecting to pay sales taxes in full.</p>
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Aloha Stadium is among the nation's busiest sports venues, but swap meets bring in twice the revenue than from spectator events in the stadium. However, the state's legislative auditor alleges that "commercial purposes" other than stadium concessions violate federal restrictions, just one of many serious questions being raised about the current swap meet operation. Further investigation is needed to determine the legality of the activities on the stadium's parking lot, and into accusations that stadium management has been terribly lax.

Revenues from the Aloha Stadium Swap Meet & Marketplace fell from a high of $5.4 million in sales in fiscal 2007-2008 to $4.8 million in 2009-2010, some of which might be attributable to the national and local recession. However, state Auditor Marion Higa has issued a scathing report, calling Centerplate, the Connecticut-based swap meet manager, "derelict in its performance." The Stadium Authority also is accused of mismanagement and allowing 26 vendors to operate without tax licenses and one-third of the top 450 vendors neglecting to pay sales taxes in full. Login for more...



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