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Some homeless need housing first


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, May 13, 2013

~~<p>The mentally ill and substance abusers make up more than a third of Honolulu's unsheltered homeless and account for an inflated drain on public resources in their cycle through hospital emergency rooms and jail. Mayor Kirk Caldwell is logical in following other cities that have found success in providing housing where these &quot;chronically homeless&quot; can be helped. The goal is commendable, but should not be at the expense of homeless children and their families also in drastic need of assistance.</p>
<p>Caldwell's project is patterned after Housing First programs that have been successful in New York City, Los Angeles and numerous other cities, and been endorsed by the Obama administration and the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, which has a budget of $5.3 billion to assist cities. Honolulu's goal is to provide rooms comparable to dormitory housing for as many as 100 of the more than 500 chronically homeless by the end of 2015, of the 1,465 unsheltered homeless residents. The mayor said he wants to expand the project, if successful, in future years.</p>
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The mentally ill and substance abusers make up more than a third of Honolulu's unsheltered homeless and account for an inflated drain on public resources in their cycle through hospital emergency rooms and jail. Mayor Kirk Caldwell is logical in following other cities that have found success in providing housing where these "chronically homeless" can be helped. The goal is commendable, but should not be at the expense of homeless children and their families also in drastic need of assistance.

Caldwell's project is patterned after Housing First programs that have been successful in New York City, Los Angeles and numerous other cities, and been endorsed by the Obama administration and the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, which has a budget of $5.3 billion to assist cities. Honolulu's goal is to provide rooms comparable to dormitory housing for as many as 100 of the more than 500 chronically homeless by the end of 2015, of the 1,465 unsheltered homeless residents. The mayor said he wants to expand the project, if successful, in future years. Login for more...



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