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Cooperation should allow public to climb scenic Haiku Stairs


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Oct 17, 2013

~~<p>It's bad enough that an ecological treasure has been officially off limits to outdoor enthusiasts for more than 20 years, but even worse that problems created by that ill-advised closure are now being used as an argument to dismantle the Haiku Stairs altogether.</p>
<p>Before public access to the spectacular Windward climb was cut off, thousands of hikers a year safely traversed the roughly 3,990 steps, rewarded for their effort with a Koolau Ridge summit that affords a sweeping view of all the ahupuaa from Kualoa to Mokapu and part of Kailua. Scientists, teachers, students, Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners, tourists and everyday residents with strong legs and strong lungs were welcome to test their mettle, thanks to a simple sign-in and liability waiver system managed by the U.S. Coast Guard, which oversaw the site at the time. According to Friends of the Haiku Stairs, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the area, more than 10,000 hikers a year climbed what is popularly known as the Stairway to Heaven.</p>
~~

It's bad enough that an ecological treasure has been officially off limits to outdoor enthusiasts for more than 20 years, but even worse that problems created by that ill-advised closure are now being used as an argument to dismantle the Haiku Stairs altogether.

Before public access to the spectacular Windward climb was cut off, thousands of hikers a year safely traversed the roughly 3,990 steps, rewarded for their effort with a Koolau Ridge summit that affords a sweeping view of all the ahupuaa from Kualoa to Mokapu and part of Kailua. Scientists, teachers, students, Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners, tourists and everyday residents with strong legs and strong lungs were welcome to test their mettle, thanks to a simple sign-in and liability waiver system managed by the U.S. Coast Guard, which oversaw the site at the time. According to Friends of the Haiku Stairs, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the area, more than 10,000 hikers a year climbed what is popularly known as the Stairway to Heaven. Login for more...



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