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Help Niihauans help themselves


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Nov 30, 2013

~~<p>If there is one community that has managed to truly live off the land, as it has for generations, it is Niihau. Now, its inhabitants of Native Hawaiian ancestry are finding their way of life threatened by outside overfishing and are pleading for regulatory help. The initial, prompt responses by state lawmakers and natural resources officials are heartening indeed &mdash; and, together with enforcement and awareness, will be needed to help return balance to the ecosystem.</p>
<p>About 100 people live on the privately owned &quot;Forbidden Island,&quot; as it's become known since Eliza Sinclair bought it in 1864 for $10,000 from King Kamehameha IV. The residents are Native Hawaiians &mdash; Hawaiian is the official language there &mdash; and they live a subsistence lifestyle: The island has no modern amenities such as electricity, grocery stores, paved roads or running water; residents rely on water catchment. Visitors are allowed onto the island by invitation only.</p>
~~

If there is one community that has managed to truly live off the land, as it has for generations, it is Niihau. Now, its inhabitants of Native Hawaiian ancestry are finding their way of life threatened by outside overfishing and are pleading for regulatory help. The initial, prompt responses by state lawmakers and natural resources officials are heartening indeed — and, together with enforcement and awareness, will be needed to help return balance to the ecosystem.

About 100 people live on the privately owned "Forbidden Island," as it's become known since Eliza Sinclair bought it in 1864 for $10,000 from King Kamehameha IV. The residents are Native Hawaiians — Hawaiian is the official language there — and they live a subsistence lifestyle: The island has no modern amenities such as electricity, grocery stores, paved roads or running water; residents rely on water catchment. Visitors are allowed onto the island by invitation only. Login for more...



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