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Thursday, April 17, 2014         

WEALTH OF HEALTH


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Cardiovascular benefits seen in therapy for metal poisoning

By Ira Zunin

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Jan 25, 2014

~~<p>Chelating agents were originally used to treat heavy metal poisoning from chemical warfare during World War I. Since then these treatments have been found useful to manage elevated levels of heavy metals from other causes. As the atmosphere and oceans become more polluted, more of the world's population absorbs heavy metal toxins such as mercury, lead and arsenic from air, water and food. Other chelating agents are being used in an effort to reverse plaque buildup in the arteries that causes heart attack and stroke. A recent study indicates that chelation therapy is of some benefit for those at high risk for cardiovascular events, especially if diabetes is also present.</p>
<p><strong>Heavy metals toxicity:</strong> Until action was taken to curb the use of lead in paint, workers who painted the hulls of ships during World War II, as well as young children who inadvertently ate lead paint, were treated with chelation therapy, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Unlike toxicity from the environment, these exposures were only in a limited population.</p>
~~

Chelating agents were originally used to treat heavy metal poisoning from chemical warfare during World War I. Since then these treatments have been found useful to manage elevated levels of heavy metals from other causes. As the atmosphere and oceans become more polluted, more of the world's population absorbs heavy metal toxins such as mercury, lead and arsenic from air, water and food. Other chelating agents are being used in an effort to reverse plaque buildup in the arteries that causes heart attack and stroke. A recent study indicates that chelation therapy is of some benefit for those at high risk for cardiovascular events, especially if diabetes is also present.

Heavy metals toxicity: Until action was taken to curb the use of lead in paint, workers who painted the hulls of ships during World War II, as well as young children who inadvertently ate lead paint, were treated with chelation therapy, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Unlike toxicity from the environment, these exposures were only in a limited population. Login for more...



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