Quantcast
  

Friday, December 19, 2014         

OUR VIEW


TO ACCESS SUBSCRIBER CONTENT:
Current Print Subscribers
ACTIVATE account
- OR -
LOGIN or SUBSCRIBE
for full digital access

Lift secrecy veil on child-abuse proceedings


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Feb 04, 2014

~~<p>A growing number of states are lifting the veil on child-abuse cases, recognizing that the court secrecy intended to protect young victims also shields child-welfare systems from public scrutiny and potential reform. Hawaii lawmakers have the opportunity to advance this important cause via Senate Bill 2002, which balances the importance of preserving confidentiality in some cases with the need for greater disclosure overall.</p>
<p>A 2012 report by the University of San Diego law school's Children's Advocacy Institute and the child advocacy group First Star highlighted how a culture of secrecy across the country hampers efforts to stem child abuse, especially in severe cases where children are killed or nearly die. Information that could prevent future tragedies remains shrouded behind restrictive disclosure laws, according to the report, which gave a letter grade to each state and called for nationwide reforms.</p>
~~

A growing number of states are lifting the veil on child-abuse cases, recognizing that the court secrecy intended to protect young victims also shields child-welfare systems from public scrutiny and potential reform. Hawaii lawmakers have the opportunity to advance this important cause via Senate Bill 2002, which balances the importance of preserving confidentiality in some cases with the need for greater disclosure overall.

A 2012 report by the University of San Diego law school's Children's Advocacy Institute and the child advocacy group First Star highlighted how a culture of secrecy across the country hampers efforts to stem child abuse, especially in severe cases where children are killed or nearly die. Information that could prevent future tragedies remains shrouded behind restrictive disclosure laws, according to the report, which gave a letter grade to each state and called for nationwide reforms. Login for more...



Login or sign up below for the complete story

Print Subscribers
ACTIVATION
Current print subscribers, activate your premium content account for unlimited online access & commenting
New Subscribers
Find subscription offers in your area and choose the package that suits your reading preferences.

14-DAY PASS
14 day premium online access and commenting ability on StarAdvertiser.com