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WEALTH OF HEALTH


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Patients in Myanmar rely on foreign doctors to fill gap

By Ira Zunin

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Feb 08, 2014

~~<p>Health care in Myanmar, also known as Burma, depends upon donated resources. I just returned from the interior after evaluating strategies for medical and humanitarian service. Last week's column reviewed the dire status of health care in this developing nation. Still ruled by a military junta, it is among the poorest on the globe. The meager national budget prioritizes spending on defense, which leaves negligible funding for health care and medical education.</p>
<p>Leading causes of death today include malnutrition, malaria, tuberculosis, dysentery and AIDS. Government hospitals are few and far between. They are staffed with physicians trained in general practice who must resort to performing emergency surgery for appendicitis, gall bladder disease, bowel obstruction, tubal pregnancies and bleeding ulcers because there are not enough trained surgeons. Outcomes are poor. Physicians are paid roughly $100 per month and, given the opportunity, often seek employment outside the country.</p>
~~

Health care in Myanmar, also known as Burma, depends upon donated resources. I just returned from the interior after evaluating strategies for medical and humanitarian service. Last week's column reviewed the dire status of health care in this developing nation. Still ruled by a military junta, it is among the poorest on the globe. The meager national budget prioritizes spending on defense, which leaves negligible funding for health care and medical education.

Leading causes of death today include malnutrition, malaria, tuberculosis, dysentery and AIDS. Government hospitals are few and far between. They are staffed with physicians trained in general practice who must resort to performing emergency surgery for appendicitis, gall bladder disease, bowel obstruction, tubal pregnancies and bleeding ulcers because there are not enough trained surgeons. Outcomes are poor. Physicians are paid roughly $100 per month and, given the opportunity, often seek employment outside the country. Login for more...



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