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Tuesday, September 30, 2014         

HOUSING FIRST


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Program's clients mistakenly ordered to leave

The letter from a state contractor traumatizes the formerly homeless residents, a worker says

By Allison Schaefers

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Feb 15, 2014

~~<p>U.S. Vets, one of the state contractors administering the high-profile Housing First program, erroneously sent out letters to about half of their formerly homeless program recipients saying that they would soon have to vacate the studio apartments that they were told were permanent homes.</p>
<p>About two years ago social workers identified Christie Higu&shy;chi as the woman at the top of Oahu's most vulnerable homeless list during registry week for 100,000 Homes Oahu, a communitywide effort to get 100 of the isle's most chronic homeless people off the streets by 2014. During October 2012 she went from using a piece of cardboard as a makeshift shelter on a grimy patch of Hotel Street in Chinatown to residing in her own studio apartment in Salt Lake. Higu&shy;chi's turbulent personal history and ill health had marked her as someone in danger of dying if she stayed on the street, where she had spent more than four years.</p>
~~

U.S. Vets, one of the state contractors administering the high-profile Housing First program, erroneously sent out letters to about half of their formerly homeless program recipients saying that they would soon have to vacate the studio apartments that they were told were permanent homes.

About two years ago social workers identified Christie Higu­chi as the woman at the top of Oahu's most vulnerable homeless list during registry week for 100,000 Homes Oahu, a communitywide effort to get 100 of the isle's most chronic homeless people off the streets by 2014. During October 2012 she went from using a piece of cardboard as a makeshift shelter on a grimy patch of Hotel Street in Chinatown to residing in her own studio apartment in Salt Lake. Higu­chi's turbulent personal history and ill health had marked her as someone in danger of dying if she stayed on the street, where she had spent more than four years. Login for more...



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