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Pali signs serve as reminder, allow officers to issue tickets

By June Watanabe

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Mar 05, 2014

~~<p><strong>Question:</strong> Can you find out who is responsible for erecting the numerous ugly, unnecessary and unfriendly blue &quot;Keep Out -- Government Property&quot; signs along Pali Highway? There are five of them along one 300-yard stretch of this beautiful road. Sillier still is the large sign near the tunnels that sits between the northbound and southbound lanes on an inaccessible piece of land that is maybe 2 yards wide by 15 yards long. There are also two signs within a few yards of each other under a tree by the Pauoa intersection with Pali Highway. What purpose do these aggressive signs have that is not served by the discreet &quot;No Parking&quot; signs on several of the same poles? And why Pali Highway rather than other pieces of state-owned land?</p>
<p><strong>Answer:</strong> The state Department of Transportation posted the signs &quot;as a visual reminder that these areas are closed to the public,&quot; said spokeswoman Caroline Sluyter.</p>
~~

Question: Can you find out who is responsible for erecting the numerous ugly, unnecessary and unfriendly blue "Keep Out -- Government Property" signs along Pali Highway? There are five of them along one 300-yard stretch of this beautiful road. Sillier still is the large sign near the tunnels that sits between the northbound and southbound lanes on an inaccessible piece of land that is maybe 2 yards wide by 15 yards long. There are also two signs within a few yards of each other under a tree by the Pauoa intersection with Pali Highway. What purpose do these aggressive signs have that is not served by the discreet "No Parking" signs on several of the same poles? And why Pali Highway rather than other pieces of state-owned land?

Answer: The state Department of Transportation posted the signs "as a visual reminder that these areas are closed to the public," said spokeswoman Caroline Sluyter. Login for more...



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