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Tuesday, July 22, 2014         

WEALTH OF HEALTH


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Detecting clogged arteries is difficult but key to health

By Ira Zunin

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Mar 08, 2014

~~<p>About $3.6 trillion is what the United States spent on health care in 2013, 3.7 percent more than 2012. Projections for 2014 anticipate a further increase of 6.1 percent. This expanded insurance coverage is made possible by the Affordable Care Act. The extra dollars are also needed to cover treatment for preventable, chronic illness much of which stems from obesity.</p>
<p>Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. It claims almost 600,000 lives, or 1 in 4 deaths each year. The economic loss, which combines the cost of health care services, medications and lost productivity, is estimated at $108.9 billion per year.</p>
~~

About $3.6 trillion is what the United States spent on health care in 2013, 3.7 percent more than 2012. Projections for 2014 anticipate a further increase of 6.1 percent. This expanded insurance coverage is made possible by the Affordable Care Act. The extra dollars are also needed to cover treatment for preventable, chronic illness much of which stems from obesity.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. It claims almost 600,000 lives, or 1 in 4 deaths each year. The economic loss, which combines the cost of health care services, medications and lost productivity, is estimated at $108.9 billion per year. Login for more...



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