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Plans to overhaul POW/MIA command necessary, overdue


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Apr 03, 2014

~~<p>For far too long, DNA technology has not been the U.S. military's primary means of testing bone fragments thought to be the remains of soldiers &quot;missing in action&quot; from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. The Hawaii-based Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command had a budget of $89 million in 2013, but the remains of only 60 service members were identified that year. At that rate, it would take nearly 600 years to identify the roughly 35,000 Americans whose remains are considered recoverable, and to bring some measure of peace to families who have waited decades to learn their loved ones' fates.</p>
<p>So it's encouraging that the complete overhaul of the embattled military organization that searches for, recovers and identifies missing American war dead recognizes the importance of high-tech identification methods. The changes are long overdue, and come after scathing reports that painted efforts by JPAC and related Pentagon agencies as dysfunctional, duplicative, inefficient and wasteful.</p>
~~

For far too long, DNA technology has not been the U.S. military's primary means of testing bone fragments thought to be the remains of soldiers "missing in action" from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. The Hawaii-based Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command had a budget of $89 million in 2013, but the remains of only 60 service members were identified that year. At that rate, it would take nearly 600 years to identify the roughly 35,000 Americans whose remains are considered recoverable, and to bring some measure of peace to families who have waited decades to learn their loved ones' fates.

So it's encouraging that the complete overhaul of the embattled military organization that searches for, recovers and identifies missing American war dead recognizes the importance of high-tech identification methods. The changes are long overdue, and come after scathing reports that painted efforts by JPAC and related Pentagon agencies as dysfunctional, duplicative, inefficient and wasteful. Login for more...



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