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Moth's biological history older than main Hawaiian Islands

The age of the insect genus suggests the northwest chain had brimmed with life

By Star-Advertiser staff

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Apr 06, 2014

~~<p>A group of University of Hawaii researchers has discovered a tiny Hawaiian moth is one of the islands' oldest insects &mdash; at 15 million years old &mdash; an insight that helps show the barren Northwest Hawaiian Islands once brimmed with biological diversity.</p>
<p>&quot;The Northwest Hawaiian Islands, which we now think of as these remote atolls and archipelagos, used to be as big as some of the main islands that we have now and they must have supported a huge diversity of organisms,&quot; said William Haines, one of three UH researchers who published an article on their findings last month in the online science journal Nature Communications.</p>
~~

A group of University of Hawaii researchers has discovered a tiny Hawaiian moth is one of the islands' oldest insects — at 15 million years old — an insight that helps show the barren Northwest Hawaiian Islands once brimmed with biological diversity.

"The Northwest Hawaiian Islands, which we now think of as these remote atolls and archipelagos, used to be as big as some of the main islands that we have now and they must have supported a huge diversity of organisms," said William Haines, one of three UH researchers who published an article on their findings last month in the online science journal Nature Communications. Login for more...



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