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Put Talia’s killer in prison for life


POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Apr 29, 2014

~~<p>The systematic brutality that 5-year-old Talia Williams suffered at the hands of her father and stepmother is enough to test the resolve of even ardent opponents of the death penalty. The crimes were heinous, committed against a helpless, disabled child, who was beaten, stomped, tied up, starved and neglected for months before suffering the brain injury that ultimately killed her. Her father, convicted of inflicting the fatal blow, is undoubtedly guilty. Still, Naeem Williams should not be executed for this crime.</p>
<p>A sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole is the just sentence here, one that holds Williams responsible for his daughter's death and also upholds Hawaii's steadfast moral opposition to capital punishment. Talia's stepmother, Delilah Williams, was equally culpable in the relentless suffering that Talia endured, yet will walk free by 2025, perhaps earlier, thanks to a deal with federal prosecutors seeking to justify the death penalty in a state that rejects the vengeful practice.</p>
~~

The systematic brutality that 5-year-old Talia Williams suffered at the hands of her father and stepmother is enough to test the resolve of even ardent opponents of the death penalty. The crimes were heinous, committed against a helpless, disabled child, who was beaten, stomped, tied up, starved and neglected for months before suffering the brain injury that ultimately killed her. Her father, convicted of inflicting the fatal blow, is undoubtedly guilty. Still, Naeem Williams should not be executed for this crime.

A sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole is the just sentence here, one that holds Williams responsible for his daughter's death and also upholds Hawaii's steadfast moral opposition to capital punishment. Talia's stepmother, Delilah Williams, was equally culpable in the relentless suffering that Talia endured, yet will walk free by 2025, perhaps earlier, thanks to a deal with federal prosecutors seeking to justify the death penalty in a state that rejects the vengeful practice. Login for more...



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