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Voyaging canoes can boost isle nations' sustainability

By Ira Zunin

POSTED: 12:42 a.m. HST, May 25, 2014

~~<p><strong>ABOARD HOKULE&lsquo;A</strong> &raquo; Keen awareness of environmental challenges faced by our blue planet must be combined with creative and practical solutions that bring prosperity. The greatest obstacle to sustainability is immediate self-interest. Despite widespread concern about global warming, gradually rising sea levels, threatened species and polluted air and water, these problems can seem remote from our daily lives. People must have access to quality shelter, food, clothing and transportation but in a way that conserves Earth's natural resources.</p>
<p>Solar-powered, traditional, Polynesian sailing canoes have the potential to transform the way cargo is moved within Pacific island nations, according to Magnus Danbolt, general manager of Pacific Voyagers Charitable Trust. I first met Danbolt when he served as admiral for a fleet of seven such canoes built in New Zealand by the trust in 2010. Their arrival in Hawaii, along with captains and crew from throughout the Pacific, stimulated dynamic dialogue within the resurgent voyaging movement in Hawaii, which had been marked by Hoku&shy;le&lsquo;a's maiden voyage to Tahiti in 1976 using noninstrument navigation.</p>
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ABOARD HOKULE‘A » Keen awareness of environmental challenges faced by our blue planet must be combined with creative and practical solutions that bring prosperity. The greatest obstacle to sustainability is immediate self-interest. Despite widespread concern about global warming, gradually rising sea levels, threatened species and polluted air and water, these problems can seem remote from our daily lives. People must have access to quality shelter, food, clothing and transportation but in a way that conserves Earth's natural resources.

Solar-powered, traditional, Polynesian sailing canoes have the potential to transform the way cargo is moved within Pacific island nations, according to Magnus Danbolt, general manager of Pacific Voyagers Charitable Trust. I first met Danbolt when he served as admiral for a fleet of seven such canoes built in New Zealand by the trust in 2010. Their arrival in Hawaii, along with captains and crew from throughout the Pacific, stimulated dynamic dialogue within the resurgent voyaging movement in Hawaii, which had been marked by Hoku­le‘a's maiden voyage to Tahiti in 1976 using noninstrument navigation. Login for more...



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