Quantcast
  

Friday, October 31, 2014         

WEALTH OF HEALTH


TO ACCESS SUBSCRIBER CONTENT:
Current Print Subscribers
ACTIVATE account
- OR -
LOGIN or SUBSCRIBE
for full digital access

Canoes' medical officers are ready for any scenario

By Ira Zunin

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, May 31, 2014

~~<p>Medical officers selected to care for crews aboard Hoku&shy;le&lsquo;a and Hikianalia during the international portion of the Worldwide Voyage prepare to practice austere, blue-water, wilderness medicine. Traditional Polynesian voyaging, which uses noninstrument navigation on a sailing canoe, is potentially hazardous. Few predictions can be made about the weather more than several days in advance, so it is impossible to fully predict the conditions one will encounter during the projected four-week sail on the first international leg from Hono&shy;lulu to Tahiti, or any of the future legs. Space for medical supplies is extremely tight, and the working conditions are austere.</p>
<p>The biggest difference between blue-water, wilderness medicine and emergency medicine is that there can be no expectation of timely backup. If a person collapses with chest pain in an urban setting, someone trained in CPR can render aid while awaiting the ambulance. In the deep ocean there is no 911. Instead, we have focused on prevention and preparation.</p>
~~

Medical officers selected to care for crews aboard Hoku­le‘a and Hikianalia during the international portion of the Worldwide Voyage prepare to practice austere, blue-water, wilderness medicine. Traditional Polynesian voyaging, which uses noninstrument navigation on a sailing canoe, is potentially hazardous. Few predictions can be made about the weather more than several days in advance, so it is impossible to fully predict the conditions one will encounter during the projected four-week sail on the first international leg from Hono­lulu to Tahiti, or any of the future legs. Space for medical supplies is extremely tight, and the working conditions are austere.

The biggest difference between blue-water, wilderness medicine and emergency medicine is that there can be no expectation of timely backup. If a person collapses with chest pain in an urban setting, someone trained in CPR can render aid while awaiting the ambulance. In the deep ocean there is no 911. Instead, we have focused on prevention and preparation. Login for more...



Login or sign up below for the complete story

Print Subscribers
ACTIVATION
Current print subscribers, activate your premium content account for unlimited online access & commenting
New Subscribers
Find subscription offers in your area and choose the package that suits your reading preferences.

14-DAY PASS
14 day premium online access and commenting ability on StarAdvertiser.com