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Hospital in Guam can help far-flung veterans

By U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Jun 15, 2014

~~<p>Ongoing concerns about our VA health care system and a recent Access Audit by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs have left policymakers, veterans and the general public searching for answers on how to provide the men and women who have served our nation with the health care they earned and deserve. While Congress has acted quickly in approving a number of short-term fixes for our most pressing concerns, and the VA has committed itself to more systemic changes for the long term, I believe that we can and must look to our own backyard to find additional solutions that will work for us.</p>
<p>In Hawaii, the VA Access Audit revealed serious and unacceptable delays in bringing new enrollees into the system, with average waits of 145 days to see a primary care physician. It is clear that the VA simply lacks the resources to address the growing backlog, which will continue to increase as the men and women of our armed services return home from Afghanistan and the services draw down on end strength.</p>
~~

Ongoing concerns about our VA health care system and a recent Access Audit by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs have left policymakers, veterans and the general public searching for answers on how to provide the men and women who have served our nation with the health care they earned and deserve. While Congress has acted quickly in approving a number of short-term fixes for our most pressing concerns, and the VA has committed itself to more systemic changes for the long term, I believe that we can and must look to our own backyard to find additional solutions that will work for us.

In Hawaii, the VA Access Audit revealed serious and unacceptable delays in bringing new enrollees into the system, with average waits of 145 days to see a primary care physician. It is clear that the VA simply lacks the resources to address the growing backlog, which will continue to increase as the men and women of our armed services return home from Afghanistan and the services draw down on end strength. Login for more...



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