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Airborne to avoid predators, flyingfish get eaten by birds

By Susan Scott

POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Aug 11, 2014

~~<p>Two weeks ago Craig and I, with about 40 others, attended our friends' wedding. We got ready for the ceremony and reception by dressing in shorts and slippers, donning hats and applying sunscreen. The event took place on a boat.</p>
<p>As we left Kewalo Basin, white terns hovered ahead, and off Waikiki a school of black durgon<strong>s</strong> surrounded the catamaran like a party of best men in blue-edged tuxedos. But the animals that caused the group to gasp were marvelous creatures that straddle the worlds of air and ocean: flyingfish, known in Hawaii as malolo.</p>
~~

Two weeks ago Craig and I, with about 40 others, attended our friends' wedding. We got ready for the ceremony and reception by dressing in shorts and slippers, donning hats and applying sunscreen. The event took place on a boat.

As we left Kewalo Basin, white terns hovered ahead, and off Waikiki a school of black durgons surrounded the catamaran like a party of best men in blue-edged tuxedos. But the animals that caused the group to gasp were marvelous creatures that straddle the worlds of air and ocean: flyingfish, known in Hawaii as malolo. Login for more...



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