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$1 billion offered for perfect NCAA tournament bracket

By Associated Press

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 08:55 a.m. HST, Jan 22, 2014


DETROIT >> Correctly predicting the outcome of every game in the NCAA men's basketball tournament is no layup. There's now a $1 billion prize waiting for anyone able to pull off the feat this spring.

Quicken Loans Inc. announced today that it will team with investor Warren Buffett's Omaha, Neb.-based Berkshire Hathaway on the "Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge."

The Detroit-based mortgage lender says any qualified entrant who correctly predicts the winners of every game in the tournament will be paid in 40 annual installments of $25 million. A winner also can elect to receive an immediate $500 million lump-sum payment or share in that payment if there's more than one perfect bracket submitted.

It's a safe investment by Buffett's group. ESPN which has run a tournament challenge for the past 16 years that has included President Barack Obama -- has never had a perfect bracket in over 30 million entries according to the network.

CBS Sports, which also has run a pool for years, said it hasn't had a perfect entry either. Last season, no unblemished brackets made it through the round of 64.

Quicken Loans Inc. said it will offer to split $2 million among the 20 most accurate predictions submitted for the contest. It will also donate $1 million to educational charities in Detroit and Cleveland, the two cities that are the main focus of Quicken founder and Chairman Dan Gilbert's activities.

"We've seen a lot of contests offering a million dollars for putting together a good bracket, which got us thinking, what is the perfect bracket worth? We decided a billion dollars seems right for such an impressive feat," said Jay Farner, president and chief marketing officer of Quicken Loans.

Submissions are limited to one per household.






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droid wrote:
The problem with “predicting” a perfect bracket is that its pure luck. You can’t know at the start of the tournament who is going to get hurt. Nor could you determine which underdog will play beyond their potential on the exact day that their higher-seeded opponent will play their worst game.

Taking all of that into consideration, the chance that someone will ever chart the perfect bracket is somewhere in the neighborhood of one in a billion. They haven’t played that many NCAA tournament games yet, much less held that many Big Dances. Think how long it takes before someone wins the lottery. In the Powerball contest, you only pick six numbers. In March Madness, you pick 64 — not including the play-in games. Still like your odds?
on January 22,2014 | 12:06AM
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