comscore Private but accessible residential roads get repaved 'as funds become available' | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Kokua Line

Private but accessible residential roads get repaved ‘as funds become available’

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Question: We seek your help to see whether Panui Street in Liliha is scheduled for repaving. It has not been repaved for over 15 years and has numerous potholes. When it rains, it looks like a land of a thousand lakes. I don’t know what the process is for determining which road will be repaved, but Booth Road in Pauoa was in good condition yet was recently repaved. Can you help us find out whether Panui Street will be repaved?

Answer: The good news is that Panui Street, although privately owned, has been identified as in need of resurfacing, said George "Keoki" Miyamoto, acting director of the city Department of Facility Maintenance.

It "will be programmed for resurfacing by contract as funds become available," he said.

The bad news is that he can’t give you a date when the work will be done.

Miyamoto explained that although Panui Street is privately owned, it qualifies for "pavement maintenance" under Section 14-32 of the Revised Ordinances of Honolulu, which deals with "Maintenance of Private Streets and Roads."

That ordinance allows the city to do remedial patching, resurfacing or paving of portions of private, nondedicated and nonsurrendered streets and roads that meet certain criteria, including being open to and serving the general public; not excluding access by the general public, such as with fences or signs saying "private"; and whose maintenance is necessary for safety reasons.

Meanwhile, roadway resurfacing priorities are determined by availability of funds, roadway condition, clearances for possible conflicts with underground utility projects, and roadway classification, such as major and minor, Miyamoto explained.

"With the funds provided each fiscal year, we program resurfacing of major roadways, bus routes and arterial collector streets first," he said. "Minor residential roadways are also programmed for resurfacing as additional funds become available."

Question: I read in your paper about a month ago about Toyota offering a free two-year maintenance plan and 24-hour roadside call service to try to win back customer trust. I bought a Toyota in July. I called Servco Pacific and was told the deal doesn’t pertain to Hawaii, although it may be available in January. Gee, didn’t we also help Toyota by buying a car in 2010?

Answer: Unfortunately, your car won’t qualify for a free two-year maintenance program now available to Hawaii residents.

The Toyota Dealers of Hawaii are offering a complimentary two-year maintenance program for new 2010 or 2011 Toyotas, but only for those purchased on or after Nov. 1.

"We regret we cannot offer Toyota-Hawaii Care for customers who purchased their Toyota vehicles before the effective promotional offering date," said Rick Ching, president of Servco Automotive.

Eligible car owners are advised to go to their dealer or to check toyotahawaii.com for details.

Question: Regarding the disabled-parking law ("Kokua Line," Nov. 6): I have a disabled-parking license plate, rather than a placard. Sometimes people tell me I can’t park in a disabled-parking stall until I point out the license plate. Can you let your readers know that you can have either a placard or a license plate to park in a restricted stall?

Answer: Disabled-parking permits may be in the form of a placard or a special license plate. The registered owner of a vehicle may obtain a special license plate if his/her disability is expected to last at least four years.

Write to "Kokua Line" at Honolulu Star-Advertiser, 7 Waterfront Plaza, Suite 210, 500 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu 96813; call 529-4773; fax 529-4750; or e-mail kokualine@staradvertiser.com.

 

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