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U.S. Supreme Court declines Kamehameha admissions case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case over whether to identify students challenging Kamehameha Schools' admissions policy giving preference to those of native Hawaiian ancestry.
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The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear a challenge by four anonymous students to the Kamehameha Schools’ admissions policy giving preference to students with Hawaiian blood.

The court, without comment, announced this morning that it denied the request by the four non-Hawaiian students, who feared they would be subject to racial attacks if their identities were disclosed.

Today’s decision ends the lawsuit by the four challenging the schools’ admissions program, said Kamehameha Chief Executive Officer Dee Jay Mailer and the schools’ trustees.

“We have believed from the outset that if this case were to proceed it should do so as openly and honestly as possible, and we are gratified that the courts agree,” they said in a message on the schools’ website.

A three-judge panel of U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed last year a ruling by Hawaii federal judges who denied the students bid to proceed anonymously.

The appeals court also refused to convene a large panel to rehear the case, but two appeals judges dissented, citing a “racially charged environment” in Hawaii.

The four students wanted the  high court to review the appeals court ruling.

The four filed their lawsuit after an unidentified student and his mother settled their lawsuit challenging the schools’ admissions policy for $7 million in 2007.

The settlement was reached before the high court was to decide whether to hear that case.

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