comscore Irons' family: 'We know that Andy's life and death were tainted by drugs' | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Top News

Irons’ family: ‘We know that Andy’s life and death were tainted by drugs’

  • STAR-ADVERTISER
    The branding of the late Andy Irons' company will be "immediately
  • irreparably and severely tarnished" if his autopsy report is released while press coverage is at a "frenzy
[ AD HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THIS STORY ]

The family of three-time world surfing champion Andy Irons of Kauai said it did not request a delay in releasing an autopsy report on Irons’ Nov. 2 death in a Dallas hotel room and is prepared for whatever the report may say.

“We would like the media and public to know that we have been anticipating the results for six months and were prepared to greet the release of this information with honesty and forthrightness,” the family said in a statement. “… We know that Andy’s life and death were tainted by drugs and are ready to accept the medical examiner’s findings.”

The autopsy report from the Tarrant County medical examiner’s office originally was scheduled to be released on Friday after Irons’ widow, Lyndie Irons, was granted a temporary injunction in December delaying its release.

At the time, Lyndie Irons said the report could tarnish her husband’s brand and that she and their newborn son are "dependent on the financial well-being of a company established by the celebrity status of Andy Irons."

Attorney Arch McColl III later modified the temporary injunction and Tarrant County District Judge Donald J. Cosby last week granted a 30-day extension on releasing Irons’ autopsy report until June 20. 

In the statement, Irons’ family said “Contrary to what was stated in a May 19th email sent out by Tarrant County Assistant District Attorney Ashley Fourt to members of the media, the Irons family did not request the extension of a motion to block the release of the autopsy results for Andy Irons due to be released by the Tarrant County Medical Examiner today.

“A lawyer in Dallas, operating without authorization from the family, made a unilateral decision to request a delay on behalf of the family as a way to provide sufficient time for the 10-page toxicology report to be translated into laymen’s terms and prevent the risk of its being misconstrued or misunderstood. Additionally, his intentions were to provide the family a moment to accept the final cause of Andy’s death.

“Unfortunately, this delay has now caused a firestorm of media speculation about the intentions of Andy’s family. We would like the media and public to know that we have been anticipating the results for six months and were prepared to greet the release of this information with honesty and forthrightness.

“We would also like to address two quotes attributed to Andy’s wife Lyndie that were recycled from six months ago and reprinted in a story today on OutsideOnline as if they were current. Firstly, Mrs. Irons has long regretted her previous remark about the truth ‘tarnishing Andy’s brand,’ which she attributes to her confusion and grief at the time of learning of her husband’s passing. Secondly, Mrs. Irons’ quote that she believes the autopsy results will ‘contradict the rumors [of] a drug overdose’ does not reflect Lyndie Irons’ or the family’s beliefs today. We know that Andy’s life and death were tainted by drugs and are ready to accept the medical examiner’s findings.

“The family has been prepared to finally learn the cause of Andy’s death and is saddened and angered to wait longer, as it was not by our choice or design. We would also like the media and public to know that Andy’s sponsors, including Billabong, have played no part in this extension and are not trying to protect Andy’s image or earnings in any way, and we hope that these inaccurate claims will cease.

“The family is still anxiously awaiting the results of the autopsy and toxicology report and will comment further, and with all due honesty, once it is provided to us.”

Irons, 32, died in his hotel room in Dallas while on his way back home to Hawaii after he withdrew from a competition in Puerto Rico.

At the time, relatives said Irons was suffering from dengue fever.

The prescription medications alprazolam and zolpidem were found in the room, according to a Dallas/Fort Worth Airport Police report. 

 

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature
Comments have been disabled for this story...

Scroll Up