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Shochu maker combines best of Japan and Hawaii

  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Namihana Imo Shochu, a traditional Japanese distilled spirit made with sweet potatoes, is produced in Haleiwa by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - A bottle of the finished Nami Hana Hawaiian Imo Shochu, left, and the locally grown white skinned, purple inside Okinawan sweet potato used in the process.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - Yumiko and Ken Hirata, owners of Hawaiian Shochu Company, in their Haleiwa production facilty that features century old ceramic vats - Kametsubo - that are used in the fermentation process, and a large, round wooden still, background left, which distills the product, and the large green holding tank that holds the shochu for 6 months before it is ready for bottling, which is also done on site. Yumiko holds a bottle of the finished shochu, left, while Ken holds the white skinned, purple inside Okinawan sweet potato.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - Yumiko and Ken Hirata, owners of Hawaiian Shochu Company, in their Haleiwa production facilty that features century old ceramic vats - Kametsubo - that are used in the fermentation process, and a large, round wooden still, background left, which distills the product, and the large green holding tank that holds the shochu for 6 months before it is ready for bottling, which is also done on site. Yumiko holds a bottle of the finished shochu, left, while Ken holds the white skinned, purple inside Okinawan sweet potato.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - The traditional Japanese rice steamer - Koshiki - which steams the rice to make the Koji rice, foreground, and the traditional wooden still, Kidaru, middle, are both used in the production of Nami Hana Imo Shochu -sweet potato traditional distilled spirits from Japan - which is brewed, distilled and bottled in Haleiwa, Hawaii, by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - Yumiko and Ken Hirata, owners of Hawaiian Shochu Company, in their Haleiwa production facilty that features century old ceramic vats - Kametsubo - that are used in the fermentation process, and a large, round wooden still, background left, which distills the product, and the large green holding tank that holds the shochu for 6 months before it is ready for bottling, which is also done on site. Yumiko holds a bottle of the finished shochu, left, while Ken holds the white skinned, purple inside Okinawan sweet potato.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - The traditional Japanese rice steamer - Koshiki - which steams the rice to make the Koji rice, foreground, and the traditional wooden still, Kidaru, middle, are both used in the production of Nami Hana Imo Shochu -sweet potato traditional distilled spirits from Japan - which is brewed, distilled and bottled in Haleiwa, Hawaii, by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - A mash of Koji rice and steamed locally grown sweet potato (white skin, purple inside) is naturally fermented in the large century old ceramic vats - Kametsubo - which are partially buried in the ground to keep the temperature steady and the ease access. Nami Hana Imo Shochu -sweet potato traditional distilled spirits from Japan - is brewed, distilled and bottled in Haleiwa, Hawaii, by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - California grown Kokuho Rose Heirloom Varietal Japanese Style Rice is used exclusively in the production of Nami Hana Imo Shochu -sweet potato traditional distilled spirits from Japan - is brewed, distilled and bottled in Haleiwa, Hawaii, by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Nami Hana Shochu - The traditiona Japanese wooden still, Kidaru, left, used in the production of Nami Hana Imo Shochu -sweet potato traditional distilled spirits from Japan - which is brewed, distilled and bottled in Haleiwa, Hawaii, by Ken and Yumiko Hirata.

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