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‘Blood moon’ peeks through cloudy skies

  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    The moon shows the red color effect of a lunar eclipse as it journeys into the shadow of the earth from the sun's light.
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Earth's shadow partially covers the moon toward the end of a total lunar eclipse Tuesday, April 15, 2014, as seen from the Milwaukee area. Tuesday's eclipse is the first of four total lunar eclipses that will take place between 2014 to 2015. (AP Photo/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Mike De Sisti)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The moon glows a red hue during a lunar eclipse as it is framed between the steeples on the Annunciation Catholic Church in Houston, Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Tuesday's eclipse is the first of four total lunar eclipses that will take place between 2014 to 2015. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Johnny Hanson)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The Earth's shadow is cast over the surface of the moon as a total lunar eclipse is seen though a Magnolia tree top in the sky over Tyler, Texas at 2:57 CDT on Tuesday morning, April 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Dr. Scott M. Lieberman)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The Earth's shadow renders the moon in a crimson hue during a total lunar eclipse behind the illuminated steeple of St. Olaf Lutheran Church in the town of Ashippun , Wis. Tuesday, April 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Wisconsin State Journal, John Hart)
  • AP
    This eight picture combo shows a total lunar eclipse over Panama City, Panama, early Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Tuesday's eclipse is the first of four total lunar eclipses that will take place between 2014 to 2015. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)
  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM
    People lined up to view the moon
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Photo gallery: "Blood Moon" Lunar Eclipse, Apr. 14

Clouds blocked some of Monday’s lunar eclipse in Honolulu, but every so often a reddish moon appeared through the clouds as the earth’s shadow covered the moon.

The eclipse actually began at 6:53 p.m. but wasn’t visible until 7:58 p.m. when the earth’s shadow began to take a bite out of the moon.

Totality happened between 9:08 p.m. and 10:24 p.m.

The moon took on a reddish glow. Some call it a blood moon.

It happens because light from the sun refracts around the earth, giving the moon a similar glow as in sunsets and sunrises.

After 10:24 p.m., the process reversed as the moon left the earth’s shadow, until 11:33 p.m. when the eclipse ended.

The University of Hawaii Manoa’s Institute for Astronomy hosted two free eclipse-viewing parties for the public at Kapiolani Park and Kahuku Public Library from 7 to 11:30 p.m.

Bishop Museum also hosting its own lunar eclipse viewing from 8 to 11:30 p.m. Monday.

There will be another chance, weather permitting, to see a lunar eclipse in Hawaii this year.

It will happen again on Oct. 8.

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