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Hawaii County police investigate officer-involved fatal shooting

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Hilo police investigated the shooting today of a man and a dog by a Hilo police officer in Kawailani. The unidentified man was confirmed to have been killed.

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Hilo police investigated the shooting today of a man and a dog by a Hilo police officer in Kawailani. The unidentified man was confirmed to have been killed.

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Hilo police investigated the shooting today of a man and a dog by a Hilo police officer in Kawailani. The unidentified man was confirmed to have been killed.

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Hilo police investigated the shooting today of a man and a dog by a Hilo police officer in Kawailani. The unidentified man was confirmed to have been killed.

Hawaii County police are investigating an officer-involved fatal shooting of a man and a dog in a residential area of Hilo Monday afternoon.

Police said they got a call at about 4:20 p.m. for a disturbance at a West Kawailani Street home.

A responding officer found a man wielding a knife. Police said a pit bull that had chased paramedics into their vehicle was also present.

The officer fired several shots, killing the man and the pit bull, police said in a news release.

The man’s name is being withheld pending positive identification.

Police shut down Kawailani Street between Kanoelehua and Kilauea avenues in Hilo at 5:30 p.m. and reopened it three hours later.

Police are conducting both a criminal investigation into the shooting and an administrative investigation by the Office of Professional Standards. Police are asking for information about the incident to call police at 935-3311 or Detective Robert Almeida at 961-2386 or Robert.almeida@hawaiicounty.gov.

Anonymous tips may be made to CrimeStoppers at 961-8300.

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  • That is why traditional media is dying. Social media got all the info, the man’s name (Kalyp Raposa), how it went down, witnesses in the area, witness accounts.

      • I agree. Traditional media has the ability to tell us so much more than social media. For example, in this case, in light of the use of force issues in our country, the public probably wants to know the details and circumstances that led the officer to conclude that deadly force was necessary. It seems obvious but we really shouldn’t assume we know what happened. That’s what we need good old fashioned reporters for: obtain verified witness statements, provide informed analysis of the circumstances, and suggest likely conclusions.

      • Isn’t Social media considered plain old gossiping? Gossip should be taken with a grain of salt! Windward_Side’s comment is excellent.

      • I will venture to say that each affirmative response to your post is done by folks in the same demographic as you. I would further venture to say that you are a Baby boomer, or at the very least, an old Xer. The level at which older folks dismiss social media is as lame as traditional media.

        • In short, I don’t take everything I read on social media as the truth. JUST as I don’t take everything written or covered in traditional media as the truth. But in social media, there are a lot of accurate information listed too…along with some bunk. Why do you think you have people from traditional media all over the threads on social media? Because social media is a viable source of information gathering. To dismiss it so easily signifies age.

  • People want to believe the worse on either side, if you don’t like a cop or the chief, you are clapping. If you believe the area is crooked, you are not surprised

  • The question is, did the victim posed a deadly threat to anyone on the occasion when confronted? That is the way I,see it. If not, exceeding police powers!

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