comscore Big Island police investigate theft of tents, canvasses from storage building | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Big Island police investigate theft of tents, canvasses from storage building

Hawaii island police are investigating the theft of tents, canvasses and other items from a storage building in Punaluu.

Police said the burglary occurred sometime between July 2 and July 7 at the O Kaʻū Kakou storage building on Alanui Road.

Among the items taken were four gray 20-by-20-foot heavy-duty canvases along with metal fittings painted red, blue and yellow. Also removed were six 10-by-10-foot pop-up tents with painted yellow markings and the letters “OKK” on the tent legs.

Police ask anyone with information about this case to call the Police Department’s nonemergency line at 935-3311 or officer Sheldon Salmo at 939-2520. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call CrimeStoppers at 961-8300.

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  • “Canvasses” is a rather strange choice of wording for the headline. (It’s spelled differently in the body also. “canvases” is the more common US usage) At any rate, when speaking of stretched canvas cloth for oil painting or to go door-to-door seeking votes, one usually uses “canvases.” Canvas, the rough hemp cloth, is more commonly used as an adjective to specify sails, tents, marquees, and tarpaulins made of the material as in “canvas tarp.”

    • (Whoops, it seems that, as I was writing, they changed the spelling in the body of the article to reflect the British usage and to agree with the headline.)

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